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Photo Portfolio, 2013

Varies
24 × 28 in
61 × 71.1 cm
Edition of 30 + 3AP
This is part of a limited edition set.
$40,000
location
Chicago
Have a question? Read our FAQ.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
About the work
Renaissance Society
Chicago
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The Renaissance Society presents a limited edition photo portfolio featuring work by twelve artists …

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The Renaissance Society presents a limited edition photo portfolio featuring work by twelve artists who were given solo exhibitions by the museum: Darren Almond, Lothar Baumgarten, Jean-Marc Bustamante, Willie Doherty, Stan Douglas, Fischli/Weiss, Rodney Graham, Arturo Herrera, Zoe Leonard, Laura Letinsky, Thomas …

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Medium
Photography
Jeff Wall
Canadian, b. 1946
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Influential photographer Jeff Wall makes large-scale color images that seem to capture people engaged in everyday life, but are in fact largely staged. Interested in the filmmaking of the postwar era, particularly the unconventional narrative structures of Neo-Realism, his best known work involves constructing elaborate mis-en-scènes, which he photographs and then displays in wall-mounted lightboxes. “I wanted to exaggerate the artificial aspect of my work as a way to create a distance from the dominant context of reportage, the legacy of Robert Frank and the others,” Wall explains. “I saw something else in photography, something to do with scale, with color and with construction, which might be valid along with the more established values that had come down from the 19th century and had been extended by the great photographers of the 20th century.” Wall’s practice is varied, and for many years has also incorporated smaller, documentary photographs and, since 1997, black-and-white pictures.

Thomas Struth
German, b. 1954
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Thomas Struth takes mesmerizing photographs that express his belief in photography as “a tool of scientific origin for psychological exploration.” He began taking pictures in 1976, influenced by his studies with three of the most important contemporary German artists of the time—painter and mixed media artist Gerhard Richter and photographers Bernd and Hilla Becher. After his early black-and-white series of deadpan views of cityscapes eerily devoid of any signs of urban life, in 1989, Struth began work on his best-known cycle, the “Museum Photographs.” In these large-format, color-saturated photographs, Struth captures individuals and crowds looking at famous works of Western art in the world’s most popular museums. While looking at the “Museum Photographs,” viewers are confronted with the act of looking itself and the social complexities of seeing and being seen.

Zoe Leonard
American, b. 1961
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Zoe Leonard’s work includes sculpture and installation, much of it politically driven, but she is primarily a photographer who discards technical questions in favor of a more experiential approach to images and media. “For me photography is intrinsically about observation,” Leonard has said. “It's about being present in and having a certain perspective on, the world around me. It's not so much about creating, or my imagination—as drawing, for instance, may be. It's more about responding.” She is also concerned with how something materializes as an image, such that its materiality and framing are as important as its content. Leonard received the Whitney's Bucksbaum Award in 2014.

Darren Almond
British, b. 1971
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Darren Almond creates films, photographs, and sculptures that explore the notion of experienced and abstract time within both the historical and personal realms. From his large-scale digital clocks such as Mono Chrono Pneumatic Red (2007) to the moonlit long-exposure shots of beautiful and desolate natural settings in his “Full Moon” series (2000-), Almond’s oeuvre explores the emotional impact of waiting and anticipation, imbuing his works with a quiet, mystical quality.

Jean-Marc Bustamante
French, b. 1952
Follow

Jean-Marc Bustamante first gained recognition with the release of his "Tableaux" series in 1977, comprised of 120 color photographs depicting desolate landscapes reminiscent of traditional landscape paintings. Throughout his practice, Bustamante has engaged in dialogue between photography and painting as well as painting and sculpture. In a recent series of works entitled “Peintures,” Bustamante applied paint to a transparent Plexiglas surface, the contours of the paint throwing shadows upon the wall behind the work to generate a visual experience that is simultaneously flat and dimensional.

Willie Doherty
Irish, b. 1959
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A photographer and video and installation artist, Willie Doherty explores the histories embedded in specific terrains, frequently returning to the subject of his native city of Derry, a locale in many ways defined by decades of fraught political conflict in Northern Ireland. Doherty’s early work often overlaid images with words and phrases, and incorporated pictures from media coverage of “The Troubles” in Northern Ireland, suggesting the slippery meaning underlying an image. In other works he combines elements of film noir, allusions to contemporary surveillance culture, and landscape imagery, to unsettling effect. His video installation The Only Good One is a Dead One (1993) turns the viewer into both assassin and target, while his film Secretion (2012) addresses the landscape of Kassel, Germany as a repository of its traumatic past. Doherty considers Richard Long, Barbara Kruger, and Jenny Holzer to be major influences on his work.

Stan Douglas
Canadian, b. 1960
Follow

Canadian photographer and video artist Stan Douglas challenges viewers’ ideas about narrative by creating non-linear, sometimes randomly generated video installations that can continue for days. Douglas’s work engages directly with a variety of source material, from Samuel Beckett’s teleplays to recognizably post-war images in the vein of press photography from that era. Douglas’s films are often accompanied by collections of photographs, as seen in Le Detroit (1999/2000), made after the series Detroit Photos (1997-1998), both of which explore decay and reinvention in beleaguered Detroit.

Rodney Graham
Canadian, b. 1949
Follow

Rodney Graham is associated with the “Vancouver School” of artists’ distinctive, photography-based practices, including Stan Douglas and Jeff Wall. Graham's multimedia works frequently incorporate diverse historical, philosophic, literary, or cinematic allusions and employ circular structures or narratives. In the film trilogy Vexation Island (1999), How I Became a Ramblin' Man (1999), and City Self/Country Self (2001), the artist plays characters like a castaway and a cowboy caught in repetitive cycles of actions and gestures.

Laura Letinsky
Canadian, b. 1962
Follow

Driven by her interest in “control, accidents, and contrivance,” Laura Letinsky is best known for her exquisitely composed still life photographs, redolent with ambiguity. Early in her career, she photographed couples in the intimacy of their own homes, creating sensual visual narratives about love and relationships. By the late 1990s, Letinsky stopped photographing people and replaced them with objects—a stained napkin, orange peels, half eaten bits of candy—that hinted at human presence. Keenly aware of the rich narrative possibilities inherent in still lifes and influenced by 17th-century Dutch still life painting, Letinsky crafts tabletop vignettes that suggest larger narratives, as she explains: “It’s this idea that the narrative has already occurred; the meal has been eaten, the cornucopia has been consumed, something has been consummated, and this is what’s left in the early morning light.”

Arturo Herrera
Venezuelan, b. 1959
Follow

Known for his intricate and evocative abstract compositions, Arturo Herrera’s frenetic, interlacing forms echo both the sinuous tangles of Jackson Pollock and the Analytic Cubism of Pablo Picasso. Herrera works in mixed media, painting (on a variety of supports), sculpture, and collage—he has attributed his interest in the latter to its being a democratic medium requiring only scissors, paper, and glue, and little studio space. Herrera has more recently turned to painting directly on gallery walls, creating large-scale compositions of wandering biomorphic imagery. He also works in felt, cutting the soft material into shapes resembling the forms in his paintings and installing them in wall-mounted reliefs, blurring traditional boundaries between two- and three-dimensional artwork.

navigate left
navigate right
Save
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View in room
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About the work
Renaissance Society
Chicago
Follow

The Renaissance Society presents a limited edition photo portfolio featuring work by twelve artists …

Read more

The Renaissance Society presents a limited edition photo portfolio featuring work by twelve artists who were given solo exhibitions by the museum: Darren Almond, Lothar Baumgarten, Jean-Marc Bustamante, Willie Doherty, Stan Douglas, Fischli/Weiss, Rodney Graham, Arturo Herrera, Zoe Leonard, Laura Letinsky, Thomas …

Read more
Medium
Photography
Jeff Wall
Canadian, b. 1946
Follow

Influential photographer Jeff Wall makes large-scale color images that seem to capture people engaged in everyday life, but are in fact largely staged. Interested in the filmmaking of the postwar era, particularly the unconventional narrative structures of Neo-Realism, his best known work involves constructing elaborate mis-en-scènes, which he photographs and then displays in wall-mounted lightboxes. “I wanted to exaggerate the artificial aspect of my work as a way to create a distance from the dominant context of reportage, the legacy of Robert Frank and the others,” Wall explains. “I saw something else in photography, something to do with scale, with color and with construction, which might be valid along with the more established values that had come down from the 19th century and had been extended by the great photographers of the 20th century.” Wall’s practice is varied, and for many years has also incorporated smaller, documentary photographs and, since 1997, black-and-white pictures.

Thomas Struth
German, b. 1954
Follow

Thomas Struth takes mesmerizing photographs that express his belief in photography as “a tool of scientific origin for psychological exploration.” He began taking pictures in 1976, influenced by his studies with three of the most important contemporary German artists of the time—painter and mixed media artist Gerhard Richter and photographers Bernd and Hilla Becher. After his early black-and-white series of deadpan views of cityscapes eerily devoid of any signs of urban life, in 1989, Struth began work on his best-known cycle, the “Museum Photographs.” In these large-format, color-saturated photographs, Struth captures individuals and crowds looking at famous works of Western art in the world’s most popular museums. While looking at the “Museum Photographs,” viewers are confronted with the act of looking itself and the social complexities of seeing and being seen.

Zoe Leonard
American, b. 1961
Follow

Zoe Leonard’s work includes sculpture and installation, much of it politically driven, but she is primarily a photographer who discards technical questions in favor of a more experiential approach to images and media. “For me photography is intrinsically about observation,” Leonard has said. “It's about being present in and having a certain perspective on, the world around me. It's not so much about creating, or my imagination—as drawing, for instance, may be. It's more about responding.” She is also concerned with how something materializes as an image, such that its materiality and framing are as important as its content. Leonard received the Whitney's Bucksbaum Award in 2014.

Darren Almond
British, b. 1971
Follow

Darren Almond creates films, photographs, and sculptures that explore the notion of experienced and abstract time within both the historical and personal realms. From his large-scale digital clocks such as Mono Chrono Pneumatic Red (2007) to the moonlit long-exposure shots of beautiful and desolate natural settings in his “Full Moon” series (2000-), Almond’s oeuvre explores the emotional impact of waiting and anticipation, imbuing his works with a quiet, mystical quality.

Jean-Marc Bustamante
French, b. 1952
Follow

Jean-Marc Bustamante first gained recognition with the release of his "Tableaux" series in 1977, comprised of 120 color photographs depicting desolate landscapes reminiscent of traditional landscape paintings. Throughout his practice, Bustamante has engaged in dialogue between photography and painting as well as painting and sculpture. In a recent series of works entitled “Peintures,” Bustamante applied paint to a transparent Plexiglas surface, the contours of the paint throwing shadows upon the wall behind the work to generate a visual experience that is simultaneously flat and dimensional.

Willie Doherty
Irish, b. 1959
Follow

A photographer and video and installation artist, Willie Doherty explores the histories embedded in specific terrains, frequently returning to the subject of his native city of Derry, a locale in many ways defined by decades of fraught political conflict in Northern Ireland. Doherty’s early work often overlaid images with words and phrases, and incorporated pictures from media coverage of “The Troubles” in Northern Ireland, suggesting the slippery meaning underlying an image. In other works he combines elements of film noir, allusions to contemporary surveillance culture, and landscape imagery, to unsettling effect. His video installation The Only Good One is a Dead One (1993) turns the viewer into both assassin and target, while his film Secretion (2012) addresses the landscape of Kassel, Germany as a repository of its traumatic past. Doherty considers Richard Long, Barbara Kruger, and Jenny Holzer to be major influences on his work.

Stan Douglas
Canadian, b. 1960
Follow

Canadian photographer and video artist Stan Douglas challenges viewers’ ideas about narrative by creating non-linear, sometimes randomly generated video installations that can continue for days. Douglas’s work engages directly with a variety of source material, from Samuel Beckett’s teleplays to recognizably post-war images in the vein of press photography from that era. Douglas’s films are often accompanied by collections of photographs, as seen in Le Detroit (1999/2000), made after the series Detroit Photos (1997-1998), both of which explore decay and reinvention in beleaguered Detroit.

Rodney Graham
Canadian, b. 1949
Follow

Rodney Graham is associated with the “Vancouver School” of artists’ distinctive, photography-based practices, including Stan Douglas and Jeff Wall. Graham's multimedia works frequently incorporate diverse historical, philosophic, literary, or cinematic allusions and employ circular structures or narratives. In the film trilogy Vexation Island (1999), How I Became a Ramblin' Man (1999), and City Self/Country Self (2001), the artist plays characters like a castaway and a cowboy caught in repetitive cycles of actions and gestures.

Laura Letinsky
Canadian, b. 1962
Follow

Driven by her interest in “control, accidents, and contrivance,” Laura Letinsky is best known for her exquisitely composed still life photographs, redolent with ambiguity. Early in her career, she photographed couples in the intimacy of their own homes, creating sensual visual narratives about love and relationships. By the late 1990s, Letinsky stopped photographing people and replaced them with objects—a stained napkin, orange peels, half eaten bits of candy—that hinted at human presence. Keenly aware of the rich narrative possibilities inherent in still lifes and influenced by 17th-century Dutch still life painting, Letinsky crafts tabletop vignettes that suggest larger narratives, as she explains: “It’s this idea that the narrative has already occurred; the meal has been eaten, the cornucopia has been consumed, something has been consummated, and this is what’s left in the early morning light.”

Arturo Herrera
Venezuelan, b. 1959
Follow

Known for his intricate and evocative abstract compositions, Arturo Herrera’s frenetic, interlacing forms echo both the sinuous tangles of Jackson Pollock and the Analytic Cubism of Pablo Picasso. Herrera works in mixed media, painting (on a variety of supports), sculpture, and collage—he has attributed his interest in the latter to its being a democratic medium requiring only scissors, paper, and glue, and little studio space. Herrera has more recently turned to painting directly on gallery walls, creating large-scale compositions of wandering biomorphic imagery. He also works in felt, cutting the soft material into shapes resembling the forms in his paintings and installing them in wall-mounted reliefs, blurring traditional boundaries between two- and three-dimensional artwork.

Photo Portfolio, 2013

Varies
24 × 28 in
61 × 71.1 cm
Edition of 30 + 3AP
This is part of a limited edition set.
$40,000
location
Chicago
Have a question? Read our FAQ.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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