Jennie Jieun Lee, ‘Untitled No. 28’, 2016, ICI Annual Benefit & Auction 2016
Jennie Jieun Lee, ‘Untitled No. 28’, 2016, ICI Annual Benefit & Auction 2016
Jennie Jieun Lee, ‘Untitled No. 28’, 2016, ICI Annual Benefit & Auction 2016
Jennie Jieun Lee, ‘Untitled No. 28’, 2016, ICI Annual Benefit & Auction 2016
Jennie Jieun Lee, ‘Untitled No. 28’, 2016, ICI Annual Benefit & Auction 2016
Jennie Jieun Lee, ‘Untitled No. 28’, 2016, ICI Annual Benefit & Auction 2016

Jennie Jieun Lee’s work is strikingly dynamic, drawing from an expressive approach to painting and sculpture — applied to ceramics. Lee’s process reads as both fixed and fluid, registered in the poured and pooled glazes that coat, shape and animate her sculptures. Trained in painting, printmaking and ceramics, Lee fuses her fluency in the different mediums with a material focus on clay and glazes. Untitled No. 28 (2016) shows a recent evolution in the artist’s practice from her increasingly iconic masks and amorphous vessels to a series of female busts. With a playful wit and a keen understanding of material presence, each of Lee’s ceramic works offers the unique beauty of imperfection.

Recently listed in Forbes as one of the “6 Can't-Miss Art Shows” for June 2016, Jennie Jieun Lee is a rising talent on the horizon. She is the recent recipient of the Pollock Krasner Foundation Grant Recipient 2016-2017.

Lee is represented by Martos Gallery, New York.

Unique.

Signature: Signed.

Martos Gallery, New York
Artist's Studio

About Jennie Jieun Lee

Jennie Jieun Lee makes expressive, richly textured ceramics covered in abstract paintings with hints of representational imagery. “While I am working I think of the humorous events in my life along with people’s interesting mannerisms and notions. Much of my visual language is fueled by experimentation [with] thoughts and color,” she has said. Although Lee has worked in printmaking and photography, ceramics are her focus. She creates an array of objects, including wheel-thrown, hand-altered vessels; masks with morphing, multipart features; and collections of vibrant mugs, plates, planters, and trays that she calls “glazemoods.” All of these works are unified by their colorful surfaces, which, according to Lee, “mimic, articulate, and navigate emotional and psychological spaces.”

Korean-American, b. 1973, Seoul, South Korea, based in Brooklyn, New York

Group Shows

2015
Anonymous Gallery, 
Mexico City,