Jenny Holzer, ‘The Usual Suspects (One off collaboration with Martin Wong, Crash, John Ahearn, Jenny Holzer, Jane Dickson, Daze, Gary Simmons, Andrew Castrucci)’, 1996, Alpha 137 Gallery Gallery Auction
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The Usual Suspects (One off collaboration with Martin Wong, Crash, John Ahearn, Jenny Holzer, Jane Dickson, Daze, Gary Simmons, Andrew Castrucci), 1996

Silkscreen on coventry rag paper
40 × 26 1/2 in
101.6 × 67.3 cm
Edition of 100
This is part of a limited edition set.
Bidding closed
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About the work
Alpha 137 Gallery Gallery Auction

Printed by Nenad Bozie, New York.

This artwork is the result of an extremely rare - indeed unique, …

Medium
Print
Signature
Ink numbered from the edition of 100, and hand-signed in pencil by all of the artists (Jenny Holzer’s signature in fountain pen)
Publisher
Avanti Galleries, New York
Jenny Holzer
American, b. 1950
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Jenny Holzer’s truisms, such as “Abuse of power comes as no surprise” and “Protect me from what I want,” have appeared on posters, billboards, and even condoms, and as LED signs and monumental light projections. Whether questioning consumerism, describing torture, or lamenting death and disease, her use of language (sometimes mistaken for advertising when installed in public spaces) is designed to agitate and disturb. Holzer’s recent work ranges from silk-screened paintings of declassified government memos to a large-scale poetry and light installation in the lobby of 7 World Trade Center, New York. In 1990, Holzer received the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale.

CRASH
American, b. 1961
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Coming of age in the Bronx in the 1960s and ’70s, John “Crash” Matos first picked up a can of spray paint at the age of 13 to cut his teeth as a graffiti artist by “bombing” the subway trains in the New York City rail yards. He has not stopped since. His bold, blocky signature—CRASH—greeted subway riders in the 1970s and ’80s, New York’s economically dire, artistically fertile days. By the 1980s, with the embrace of his work by galleries and at the urging of his friend and contemporary, Keith Haring, Crash was translating his explosive outdoor murals to the canvas’s more contained plane. He remains busy with commissions and collaborations, claiming that his future holds “more work, more painting, more strats, more walls, more lobsters, more steaks…in other words more living to do.”

Gary Simmons
American, b. 1964
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Gary Simmons references film, architecture, and American popular culture in paintings and drawings that address race, class, and memory on both personal and collective levels. In his 2010 exhibition "Midnight Matinee," Simmons used images of drive-in theater marquees and houses from vintage horror films to reflect on ghosts and abandoned pasts. Simmons has centered much of his practice on erasure. Early on he drew in white chalk on readymade chalkboards or directly onto slate-painted walls, then smudged the images with his hands, and in recent years he has adapted the process to canvas, using pigment, oil paint, and cold wax.

Andrew Castrucci
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Jenny Holzer, ‘The Usual Suspects (One off collaboration with Martin Wong, Crash, John Ahearn, Jenny Holzer, Jane Dickson, Daze, Gary Simmons, Andrew Castrucci)’, 1996, Alpha 137 Gallery Gallery Auction
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Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
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About the work
Alpha 137 Gallery Gallery Auction

Printed by Nenad Bozie, New York.

This artwork is the result of an extremely rare - indeed unique, one-off -- collaboration - a spectacular limited edition signed and numbered silkscreen, hand signed by all nine of the distinguished contemporary artists listed below (including the deceased Martin Wong) who …

Medium
Print
Signature
Ink numbered from the edition of 100, and hand-signed in pencil by all of the artists (Jenny Holzer’s signature in fountain pen)
Publisher
Avanti Galleries, New York
Jenny Holzer
American, b. 1950
Follow

Jenny Holzer’s truisms, such as “Abuse of power comes as no surprise” and “Protect me from what I want,” have appeared on posters, billboards, and even condoms, and as LED signs and monumental light projections. Whether questioning consumerism, describing torture, or lamenting death and disease, her use of language (sometimes mistaken for advertising when installed in public spaces) is designed to agitate and disturb. Holzer’s recent work ranges from silk-screened paintings of declassified government memos to a large-scale poetry and light installation in the lobby of 7 World Trade Center, New York. In 1990, Holzer received the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale.

CRASH
American, b. 1961
Follow

Coming of age in the Bronx in the 1960s and ’70s, John “Crash” Matos first picked up a can of spray paint at the age of 13 to cut his teeth as a graffiti artist by “bombing” the subway trains in the New York City rail yards. He has not stopped since. His bold, blocky signature—CRASH—greeted subway riders in the 1970s and ’80s, New York’s economically dire, artistically fertile days. By the 1980s, with the embrace of his work by galleries and at the urging of his friend and contemporary, Keith Haring, Crash was translating his explosive outdoor murals to the canvas’s more contained plane. He remains busy with commissions and collaborations, claiming that his future holds “more work, more painting, more strats, more walls, more lobsters, more steaks…in other words more living to do.”

Gary Simmons
American, b. 1964
Follow

Gary Simmons references film, architecture, and American popular culture in paintings and drawings that address race, class, and memory on both personal and collective levels. In his 2010 exhibition "Midnight Matinee," Simmons used images of drive-in theater marquees and houses from vintage horror films to reflect on ghosts and abandoned pasts. Simmons has centered much of his practice on erasure. Early on he drew in white chalk on readymade chalkboards or directly onto slate-painted walls, then smudged the images with his hands, and in recent years he has adapted the process to canvas, using pigment, oil paint, and cold wax.

Andrew Castrucci
Follow

The Usual Suspects (One off collaboration with Martin Wong, Crash, John Ahearn, Jenny Holzer, Jane Dickson, Daze, Gary Simmons, Andrew Castrucci), 1996

Silkscreen on coventry rag paper
40 × 26 1/2 in
101.6 × 67.3 cm
Edition of 100
This is part of a limited edition set.
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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