Jenny Saville, ‘Reproduction drawing IV (after the Leonardo cartoon)’, 2010, Gagosian
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Jenny Saville

Reproduction drawing IV (after the Leonardo cartoon), 2010

Pencil on paper
89 5/16 × 69 5/8 in
226.9 × 176.8 cm
Location
New York, Beverly Hills, London, Paris, Le Bourget, Geneva, Basel, Rome, Athens, Central, Hong Kong
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About the work
Medium
Jenny Saville
British, b. 1970
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Fascinated by pathological perceptions of the body, Jenny Saville’s paintings depict grotesque, hyperreal visions of the human figure where faces are dismembered and flesh abounds. Using thick layers of oil paint, Saville’s work challenges her genre, combining art historical tropes by merging Peter Paul Rubens’s classic figuration with Chaim Soutine’s visceral portrayals of carcasses, Cubism’s fractured planes, and Abstract Expressionism’s gestural strokes. Inspired by and reflecting a wide range of topics—from obese women in American shopping malls to bodies beyond the gender binary and brassiere imprints—Saville’s paintings have become emblematic of the female gaze. “I want to be a painter of modern life, and modern bodies,” she says. In 2018, Saville’s early nude portrait Propped (1992), which portrays a woman gripping at her flesh in the face of a cloudy mirror, sold for $12.4 million.

Jenny Saville, ‘Reproduction drawing IV (after the Leonardo cartoon)’, 2010, Gagosian
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
Medium
Jenny Saville
British, b. 1970
Follow

Fascinated by pathological perceptions of the body, Jenny Saville’s paintings depict grotesque, hyperreal visions of the human figure where faces are dismembered and flesh abounds. Using thick layers of oil paint, Saville’s work challenges her genre, combining art historical tropes by merging Peter Paul Rubens’s classic figuration with Chaim Soutine’s visceral portrayals of carcasses, Cubism’s fractured planes, and Abstract Expressionism’s gestural strokes. Inspired by and reflecting a wide range of topics—from obese women in American shopping malls to bodies beyond the gender binary and brassiere imprints—Saville’s paintings have become emblematic of the female gaze. “I want to be a painter of modern life, and modern bodies,” she says. In 2018, Saville’s early nude portrait Propped (1992), which portrays a woman gripping at her flesh in the face of a cloudy mirror, sold for $12.4 million.

Jenny Saville

Reproduction drawing IV (after the Leonardo cartoon), 2010

Pencil on paper
89 5/16 × 69 5/8 in
226.9 × 176.8 cm
Location
New York, Beverly Hills, London, Paris, Le Bourget, Geneva, Basel, Rome, Athens, Central, Hong Kong
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
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