Jim Dine, ‘Wolf-Man's Dream an etching to accompany The Case of the Wolf Man by Sigmund Freud’, 1993, Arion Press
Jim Dine, ‘Wolf-Man's Dream an etching to accompany The Case of the Wolf Man by Sigmund Freud’, 1993, Arion Press
Jim Dine, ‘Wolf-Man's Dream an etching to accompany The Case of the Wolf Man by Sigmund Freud’, 1993, Arion Press
Jim Dine, ‘Wolf-Man's Dream an etching to accompany The Case of the Wolf Man by Sigmund Freud’, 1993, Arion Press
Jim Dine, ‘Wolf-Man's Dream an etching to accompany The Case of the Wolf Man by Sigmund Freud’, 1993, Arion Press

A large extra etching by Jim Dine, "The Wolf-Man's Dream", was published simultaneously with the book. The prints were editioned by Kurt Zein in Vienna in black ink with the title printed from a relief block in red ink. The intaglio image is 45 by 39 inches on mouldmade paper 59 by 44 inches. The book alone is out of print, but the book & print edition is available. The print must be purchased with a copy of the book (price included).

Of Freud's case histories, that of the Wolf-Man, under the title "From the History of an Infantile Neurosis", is the most famous, not only for its importance to the development of Freud's thought but also for the grip upon public imagination that it holds to this day. It was written in the winter of 1914-15, shortly after termination of a treatment that had begun in 1910. The subject, the son of a wealthy Russian landowner, was tormented by a childhood dream of white wolves sitting staring at him from the bare branches of a tree outside his bedroom window in winter. This and other vivid images released by the psychoanalysis are used by Dine. Jim Dine is an artist of international stature. His paintings, sculpture, drawings, and prints are in the collections of major museums throughout the world. The introductory essay by the philosopher and art historian Richard Wollheim reviews the story of the Wolf-Man and considers the significance of this case for Freud, his followers, and critics.

Signature: All books and prints are signed by the artist.

About Jim Dine

Although often associated with both Pop Art and Abstract Expressionism, Jim Dine did not identify with a specific movement, producing a vast oeuvre of paintings, drawings, works on paper, sculpture, poetry, and performances. Emerging as a pioneer (together with Allan Kaprow, Claes Oldenburg, and Robert Whitman) of New York’s Happenings of the 1960s, Dine would carry the spontaneous energy of this movement throughout his style, which emphasized the exploration of everyday life. Personally significant objects were Dine’s primary motifs, as in his iconic series of hearts and robes. He championed a return to figuration after a period of more concept-dominated works, and is considered an important figure in Neo-Dada and a forerunner of Neo-Expressionism. “The figure is still the only thing I have faith in in terms of how much emotion it’s charged with and how much subject matter is there,” he once said.

American, b. 1935, Cincinnati, Ohio, based in New York, Paris and Walla Walla, Washington

Exhibition Highlights

2017
New York,
Primary Objects: Jim Dine in the 1960's