Joan Miró, ‘El Vol de l'Alosa. Els poetes mallorquins a Joan Miró’, 1973, Sylvan Cole Gallery

El Vol de l'Alosa. Els poetes mallorquins a Joan Miró.
Mossèn Alcover, Palma de Mallorca, 1973.

A tribute to Miro from the poets of Mallorca, the island where he spent his final years. Includes a poem by Robert Graves (who lived much of his life in Mallorca), perhaps the only poem Graves ever wrote in Catalan.

ILLUSTRATED THROUGHOUT BY MIRO, in color and black & white. According to the justification, 590 copies were printed: 90 on specially-made Guarro laid paper with Miró's signature as the watermark, signed by Miro and with a signed lithograph; and 500 on regular paper and not signed.

THIS IS A SPECIAL PUBLISHER'S PROOF COPY (justified, in Catalan, "prova d'editor") ASIDE FROM THE ANNOUNCED EDITION. It was issued without the signed lithograph, but IT IS PRINTED ON THE SPECIAL GUARRO LAID PAPER AND IS SIGNED IN THE JUSTIFICATION BY MIRO.

Laid in is a large card from Pere Bauçà (one of the editors and the author of the prologue) with a long manuscript presentation note (in Spanish) to an unnamed correspondent--obviously a high official in the Spanish government--expressing appreciation for a visit from the Prince and Princess (who would later become King Juan Carlos I and Queen Sofia).

Large folio. Loose as issued in original wraps, cloth chemise and folding case beautifully decorated in color by Miró. Box a tiny bit dusty, else FINE AND BRIGHT WITH NO DEFECTS.

Perhaps unique in this state.

Cramer 170

About Joan Miró

Joan Miró rejected the constraints of traditional painting, creating works “conceived with fire in the soul but executed with clinical coolness,” as he once said. Widely considered one of the leading Surrealists, though never officially part of the group, Miró pioneered a wandering linear style of Automatism—a method of “random” drawing that attempted to express the inner workings of the human psyche. Miró used color and form in a symbolic rather than literal manner, his intricate compositions combining abstract elements with recurring motifs like birds, eyes, and the moon. “I try to apply colors like words that shape poems, like notes that shape music,” he said. While he prized artistic freedom, Miró revered art history, basing a series of works on the Dutch Baroque interiors of Hendrick Sorgh and Jan Steen. In turn, Miró has inspired many artists—significantly Arshile Gorky, whose bold linear abstractions proved a foundational influence on Abstract Expressionism.

Spanish, 1893-1983, Barcelona, Spain, based in Paris and Catalonia, Spain