Joan Miró, ‘"Group Show", Exhibition Invitation, Galerie Beyeler Basel’, 1979, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Joan Miró, ‘"Group Show", Exhibition Invitation, Galerie Beyeler Basel’, 1979, VINCE fine arts/ephemera

GALERIE BEYELER BASEL Swiss Exhibit, 9-1/2" diameter

Signature: Not Signed

GALERIE BEYELER BASEL

About Joan Miró

Joan Miró rejected the constraints of traditional painting, creating works “conceived with fire in the soul but executed with clinical coolness,” as he once said. Widely considered one of the leading Surrealists, though never officially part of the group, Miró pioneered a wandering linear style of Automatism—a method of “random” drawing that attempted to express the inner workings of the human psyche. Miró used color and form in a symbolic rather than literal manner, his intricate compositions combining abstract elements with recurring motifs like birds, eyes, and the moon. “I try to apply colors like words that shape poems, like notes that shape music,” he said. While he prized artistic freedom, Miró revered art history, basing a series of works on the Dutch Baroque interiors of Hendrick Sorgh and Jan Steen. In turn, Miró has inspired many artists—significantly Arshile Gorky, whose bold linear abstractions proved a foundational influence on Abstract Expressionism.

Spanish, 1893-1983, Barcelona, Spain, based in Paris and Catalonia, Spain

About Jean Arp

A pioneer of abstract art, Jean (aka Hans) Arp was instrumental in founding the Dada movement and participated actively in Surrealism and Constructivism. In his collages, reliefs, and sculptures, Arp often incorporated waste material such as discarded paper and fabric, and embraced chance and spontaneity as integral components of the artistic process. In Collage with Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance (1916), for example, Arp explored the potential for unique compositional relationships that result from inadvertent arrangement of collage elements. Arp’s articulation of biomorphic forms, inspired by organic material and the human figure, was simultaneously explored by Joan Miró and proved to be hugely influential to later 20th-century abstract artists.

German-French, 1886-1966, Strasbourg, Germany, based in Zurich, Switzerland

About Sonia Delaunay

Sonia Delaunay’s innovative explorations of color and form began with a quilt she made for her son in 1911 that would spur a breakthrough in the history of abstraction. She had moved from Moscow to Paris at age 20, where she first encountered Post-Impressionism and Fauvism, inspiring her to push further toward non-objective art. Along with her husband, Robert Delaunay, she developed a bright blend of Cubism and Futurism that would be dubbed Orphism by critic Guillaume Apollinaire in 1910—though Delaunay preferred the term “Simultaneous Contrasts”. In addition to painting, she created textiles as “exercises in color,” under the Maison Delaunay label, even creating costumes for Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes. In 1964, Delaunay became the first living woman to be given a retrospective at the Louvre.

Ukrainian, 1885-1979, Gradizhsk, Ukraine, based in Paris, France

About Maria Helena Vieira da Silva

Maria Helena Vieira Da Silva rose to prominence as the best known Portuguese artist—and one of the few women—on the post-World-War II Paris art scene, and became the first female artist to receive the French government’s prestigious Grand Prix National des Arts in 1966. Within this “School of Paris,” as it was called, Vieira Da Silva represented a unique approach that was less gestural and more geometric than the dominant Art Informel style. She melded her early schooling with the French Cubist Fernand Léger with other modern styles, like Futurism and Constructivism, to create paintings that resembled abstracted urban grids and united multiple perspectives into a fractured sense of space.

Portugese, 1908-1992, Lisbon, Portugal, based in Paris, France

About Bridget Riley

Bridget Riley is an abstract painter who came to prominence in the American Op Art movement of the 1960s, after her inclusion in the 1965 exhibition “The Responsive Eye” at The Museum of Modern Art. There, her black-and-white paintings—which created illusions of movement—were shown alongside works by Victor Vasarely, Richard Anuszkiewicz, Frank Stella, and Ellsworth Kelly, among others. In the late '60s, she introduced color into her work and went on to win the Prize for Painting at the 1968 Venice Biennale. Since then her work has unfolded through numerous groups and series that engage the viewers' perception to induce simultaneously shifting patterns of forms and changing, optical mixtures of colors. Over the past decade, she has also made large, black-and-white murals that shape and articulate the environments they occupy. Her work is ultimately inspired by nature—“although in completely different terms,” she says, adding, “For me nature is not landscape, but the dynamism of visual forces—an event rather than an appearance.”

British, b. 1931, Norwood, London, United Kingdom, based in London, United Kingdom

Exhibition Highlights

2017
New York,
2016
London,
New Tate Modern Switch House: Extension and Installation