Joan Miró, ‘Ocells de Montroig I-V’, 1979, Christie's
Joan Miró, ‘Ocells de Montroig I-V’, 1979, Christie's
Joan Miró, ‘Ocells de Montroig I-V’, 1979, Christie's
Joan Miró, ‘Ocells de Montroig I-V’, 1979, Christie's
Joan Miró, ‘Ocells de Montroig I-V’, 1979, Christie's
Joan Miró, ‘Ocells de Montroig I-V’, 1979, Christie's
Joan Miró, ‘Ocells de Montroig I-V’, 1979, Christie's
Joan Miró, ‘Ocells de Montroig I-V’, 1979, Christie's

Each signed, dated 3/V.79. and inscribed Bat. in pencil, bon à tirer impressions printed by Joan Barbará, Barcelona, 1979, before the posthumous edition of 45 published by Maeght, the full sheets, generally in very good condition
Plate 393 x 297 mm., Sheets 660 x 500 mm. (and similar)
(5)

From the Catalogue:
The plates for Ocells de Montroig or Birds of Montroig were made by Miro in 1979 at the print studio of Joan Barbará, Barcelona. Produced late in the artist’s life, the series reveals his imagination undimmed by the physical constraints of age. The title is a double entendre - the Catalan word 'ocells’ (birds) is also used colloquially to denote male genitalia – and the swirling and seemingly abstract forms are imbued with a playfully suggestive eroticism. The edition was not realised before the artist’s death, and these rare proofs, signed and inscribed bon á tirer by the artist, are the only known, signed life-time impressions.
—Courtesy of Christie's

Christie's Special Notice
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.

See Dupin 1216-1220

Joan Barbará (1927-2013), Barcelona; then by descent to the present owner.

About Joan Miró

Joan Miró rejected the constraints of traditional painting, creating works “conceived with fire in the soul but executed with clinical coolness,” as he once said. Widely considered one of the leading Surrealists, though never officially part of the group, Miró pioneered a wandering linear style of Automatism—a method of “random” drawing that attempted to express the inner workings of the human psyche. Miró used color and form in a symbolic rather than literal manner, his intricate compositions combining abstract elements with recurring motifs like birds, eyes, and the moon. “I try to apply colors like words that shape poems, like notes that shape music,” he said. While he prized artistic freedom, Miró revered art history, basing a series of works on the Dutch Baroque interiors of Hendrick Sorgh and Jan Steen. In turn, Miró has inspired many artists—significantly Arshile Gorky, whose bold linear abstractions proved a foundational influence on Abstract Expressionism.

Spanish, 1893-1983, Barcelona, Spain, based in Paris and Catalonia, Spain