John Armleder, ‘Divisions’, 2016, World House Editions

John Armleder has been using the dot motif since the late 1970s and they can be found in the artist’s paintings, drawings, prints and even multiple objects. Clearly paying homage to such avant-garde artists as Francis Picabia, Alexander Rodchenko, Larry Poons and even Tom Downing, John Armleder, through his notion of appropriation, has raised the simple, optical concept and arrangement of dots from a pure mode of abstract pictorial composition to a systematic concept of representation and perhaps even structural analysis.

Signature: Signed, dated, titled and numbered in pencil on the reverse

Publisher: World House Editions

Staff. "News of the Print World: Selected New Editions", article in Art in Print, volume 6, number 2, September-October 2016, p.50 (another example).

About John Armleder

Performance artist, sculptor, and painter John M. Armleder draws from what he calls a "supermarket of forms." His art can take on attributes of Suprematist painting, Minimalist sculpture, Dada readymades, or, in the case of his wall paintings, actual wallpaper (turning Sol LeWitt’s ideology on its head while referencing Francis Picabia's dots or Surrealism's lobsters). Affiliated with Fluxus in the 1960s and ‘70s, Armleder was also associated with Neo-Geo (short for Neo-Geometric Conceptualism) in the 1980s for his furniture sculptures, conflating art and the design object. His works explore decor as the inevitable devolution of cultural expressions into background elements.

Swiss, b. 1948, Geneva, Switzerland