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Page 1 of 9
Page 1 of 9
Friends Seminary Benefit Auction

Each image: 11 x 14 in.

Artists included: John Currin, Rachel Feinstein, Liam Gillick, Jacqueline Humphries, Sean Landers, Sarah Morris, Tony Oursler, Richard Phillips

Medium
Signature
Signed and numbered, verso
Image rights
Courtesy of the Friends Seminary Collection

American painter John Currin intertwines the beautiful and grotesque with equal measure in his caricatures of lusty, doe-eyed female figures often portrayed in gross proportions that both enchant and repel. Drawing on a broad range of cultural influences from Renaissance oil paintings to 1950s women’s magazine ads and contemporary politics, his work is notable for its mix of technical virtuosity with mash-ups of high and low culture.

High auction record
$12.0m, Christie's, 2016
Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions
2019
John CurrinGagosian
John CurrinGagosian
John Currin: My Life as a ManDallas Contemporary
View all

Inspired by everything from classical sculpture and Roman ruins to Renaissance painting and contemporary cartoons, Rachel Feinstein makes expressive sculptures, multi-part installations, and richly rendered paintings and drawings full of massive, sculptural forms. Unafraid to pursue beauty, Feinstein emphasizes shape and texture in her works, which develop out of an imaginative, additive process that begins with a source image, often discovered in old books. A striking detail serves as the departure point from which she begins her creative interpretation and re-invention. As the artist describes: “I’ll do a drawing, and then drawings of the drawing, and keep getting away from the source as many times over as I can so I don’t just replicate.” Feinstein’s sculptures appear as semi-abstracted, decidedly 21st-century versions of their historical counterparts, which include depictions of early Christian saints and the ash-preserved bodies of victims of Mount Vesuvius.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2018
Rachel Feinstein: SecretsGagosian
2014
Rachel Feinstein: FollyMadison Square Park
2012
Rachel FeinsteinGagosian
View all

Young British Artist Liam Gillick is primarily interested in analyzing structures, social organizations, and human interaction. Using mass-produced materials, such as aluminum, chipboard, and Plexiglas, Gillick creates modular objects that he arranges in site-specific installations to explore how evidence of our social, political, and economic systems are embedded in the built environment. An early practitioner of Relational Aesthetics, Gillick's cross-disciplinary practice also comprises music composition, writing, and curatorial projects.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2020
Liam Gillick: RedactionCasey Kaplan
Liam Gillick | It should feel like unicorns are about to appear a.k.a. Half Awake Half AsleepAlfonso Artiaco
2017
Liam Gillick „Extended Soundtrack For A Lost Production Line: Ton und Film“Galerie Eva Presenhuber
View all

Jacqueline Humphries is an abstract painter whose technique often involves applying paint in layers, then scraping it away, revealing evidence of her process. Born in 1960 in New Orleans, Humphries has had recent solo museum exhibitions at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh and the Contemporary Art Center New Orleans. Her work was also included in the 2014 Whitney Biennial and is in the permanent collections of the Whitney, the Museum of Modern Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Tate Modern in London, among other institutions.

Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions
2021
Signs of a SeriesCrown Point Press
2020
Abstraction: Four PaintersCrown Point Press
2019
Summer Group ShowGalerie Heinz Holtmann
View all

Sean Landers achieved recognition in the early 1990s for work derived from his confessional outpourings, densely covering paper and canvas with imagery of breasts, chimpanzees, and clowns. In addition to his text-based compositions, he creates cartoons, bronze busts, videos, and figurative paintings of animals and humans that show extreme shifts in style, including remakes of William Hogarth's 1732 canvas A Midnight Modern Conversation and the "Around the World Alone" series, in which a clown captain mans a ship in dramatic seas.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2017
The TimesThe FLAG Art Foundation
2014
Sean Landers: North American MammalsPetzel Gallery
2013
Drawing Time, Reading TimeDrawing Center
View all

Since the mid-1990s, artist Sarah Morris has produced a large body of work using both painting and film, which create a new language of place and politics.

Morris’ paintings and films contain elements that complement and connect to one another, generating a constant back-and-forth play between the two. In her paintings, she uses colors and geometries that she associates with a city’s unique aesthetic vocabulary and palette, as well as its character and multiple histories. Within the framework, Morris’ work plays with social and bureaucratic typologies to implicate obstructive systems of control. In her films President Bill Clinton, Chase Bank, Philip Johnson, Robert Towne, the film industry, poster design, the Olympics, the banking system, Oscar Niemeyer, J.G. Ballard, perfume, lunar cycles, pharmaceutical packaging, birdcages and even fruit are all fair game.

In writer Bettina Funcke’s words: “She wants to be both author and protagonist, and to her that means using compromised personalities and places as portals into entanglements of power, generating a sense of dizzying simultaneity that she translates into motives and resources for her paintings and a flow of images for her films, all of which add up to topologies of a moment in the life of power and style.”

— Submitted by the artist’s studio

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2019
Sarah Morris: Machines do not make us into MachinesWhite Cube
Sarah Morris: Today we find ourselves at an impasseFortes D'Aloia & Gabriel
2018
Sarah Morris: Odysseus FactorUCCA
View all

A pioneer of new-media art since the mid-1970s, Tony Oursler is best known for his video projections and installation works that explore technology's effects on the human mind. Honing in on much of humanity's compulsive relationship with computers and virtual networks, Oursler orchestrates microcosmic scenes, tableaus, and interventions that convey the obsession, escapism, isolation, and sexual fetish that cause or grow out of technological dependence. His works include talking streetlights, an eight-foot-long five-dollar bill with an eerily animated Abe Lincoln, an enormous cell phone spewing disjointed snippets of conversations, and ghoulish heads muttering phrases like “You treat me like garbage. I told you I love you but I don’t. Thanks for nothing.” Oursler invites viewers into disorienting psychological mini-dramas, at once engaging in their humor and disturbing for their uncanny juxtapositions and keen, biting commentaries.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions
2017
Sound Digressions: SpectrumGalerie Mitterrand
2016
TONY OURSLER »𝗉𝖴#\*𝖼«Galerie Hans Mayer
2014
Tony Oursler: ObscuraGalerie Hans Mayer
View all

Richard Phillips' portraits combine lurid imagery with a refined, academic painting style. Valuing critique as an intrinsic part of composition as much as canvas and paint, Phillips takes material from sources like soft porn, advertising, fashion, celebrity culture, and Pop art, translating it into glossy, photorealist works with stylized, close-up figures rendered in heightened color or black and white. His provocative oil paintings—such as Frieze, 2009, a realistic representation of a woman on her back with and issue of the art magazine Frieze inserted into her vagina—reveal how images can be used to distort truth and wield power.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2015
Richard PhillipsGagosian
2014
Gallery Weekend Berlin: RICHARD PHILLIPSGalerie Max Hetzler
Richard Phillips: Negation of the UniverseDallas Contemporary
View all

Valley of Mist 2, 2012

Portfolio of eight archival inkjet prints on acid free paper in archival portfolio box
Edition of 20 + 8AP
Bidding closed
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Friends Seminary Benefit Auction

Each image: 11 x 14 in.

Artists included: John Currin, Rachel Feinstein, Liam Gillick, Jacqueline …

Medium
Signature
Signed and numbered, verso
Image rights
Courtesy of the Friends Seminary Collection

American painter John Currin intertwines the beautiful and grotesque with equal measure in his caricatures of lusty, doe-eyed female figures often portrayed in gross proportions that both enchant and repel. Drawing on a broad range of cultural influences from Renaissance oil paintings to 1950s women’s magazine ads and contemporary politics, his work is notable for its mix of technical virtuosity with mash-ups of high and low culture.

High auction record
$12.0m, Christie's, 2016
Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Selected exhibitions (3)

Inspired by everything from classical sculpture and Roman ruins to Renaissance painting and contemporary cartoons, Rachel Feinstein makes expressive sculptures, multi-part installations, and richly rendered paintings and drawings full of massive, sculptural forms. Unafraid to pursue beauty, Feinstein emphasizes shape and texture in her works, which develop out of an imaginative, additive process that begins with a source image, often discovered in old books. A striking detail serves as the departure point from which she begins her creative interpretation and re-invention. As the artist describes: “I’ll do a drawing, and then drawings of the drawing, and keep getting away from the source as many times over as I can so I don’t just replicate.” Feinstein’s sculptures appear as semi-abstracted, decidedly 21st-century versions of their historical counterparts, which include depictions of early Christian saints and the ash-preserved bodies of victims of Mount Vesuvius.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Young British Artist Liam Gillick is primarily interested in analyzing structures, social organizations, and human interaction. Using mass-produced materials, such as aluminum, chipboard, and Plexiglas, Gillick creates modular objects that he arranges in site-specific installations to explore how evidence of our social, political, and economic systems are embedded in the built environment. An early practitioner of Relational Aesthetics, Gillick's cross-disciplinary practice also comprises music composition, writing, and curatorial projects.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Jacqueline Humphries is an abstract painter whose technique often involves applying paint in layers, then scraping it away, revealing evidence of her process. Born in 1960 in New Orleans, Humphries has had recent solo museum exhibitions at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh and the Contemporary Art Center New Orleans. Her work was also included in the 2014 Whitney Biennial and is in the permanent collections of the Whitney, the Museum of Modern Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Tate Modern in London, among other institutions.

Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Sean Landers achieved recognition in the early 1990s for work derived from his confessional outpourings, densely covering paper and canvas with imagery of breasts, chimpanzees, and clowns. In addition to his text-based compositions, he creates cartoons, bronze busts, videos, and figurative paintings of animals and humans that show extreme shifts in style, including remakes of William Hogarth's 1732 canvas A Midnight Modern Conversation and the "Around the World Alone" series, in which a clown captain mans a ship in dramatic seas.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Since the mid-1990s, artist Sarah Morris has produced a large body of work using both painting and film, which create a new language of place and politics.

Morris’ paintings and films contain elements that complement and connect to one another, generating a constant back-and-forth play between the two. In her paintings, she uses colors and geometries that she associates with a city’s unique aesthetic vocabulary and palette, as well as its character and multiple histories. Within the framework, Morris’ work plays with social and bureaucratic typologies to implicate obstructive systems of control. In her films President Bill Clinton, Chase Bank, Philip Johnson, Robert Towne, the film industry, poster design, the Olympics, the banking system, Oscar Niemeyer, J.G. Ballard, perfume, lunar cycles, pharmaceutical packaging, birdcages and even fruit are all fair game.

In writer Bettina Funcke’s words: “She wants to be both author and protagonist, and to her that means using compromised personalities and places as portals into entanglements of power, generating a sense of dizzying simultaneity that she translates into motives and resources for her paintings and a flow of images for her films, all of which add up to topologies of a moment in the life of power and style.”

— Submitted by the artist’s studio

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

A pioneer of new-media art since the mid-1970s, Tony Oursler is best known for his video projections and installation works that explore technology's effects on the human mind. Honing in on much of humanity's compulsive relationship with computers and virtual networks, Oursler orchestrates microcosmic scenes, tableaus, and interventions that convey the obsession, escapism, isolation, and sexual fetish that cause or grow out of technological dependence. His works include talking streetlights, an eight-foot-long five-dollar bill with an eerily animated Abe Lincoln, an enormous cell phone spewing disjointed snippets of conversations, and ghoulish heads muttering phrases like “You treat me like garbage. I told you I love you but I don’t. Thanks for nothing.” Oursler invites viewers into disorienting psychological mini-dramas, at once engaging in their humor and disturbing for their uncanny juxtapositions and keen, biting commentaries.

Blue chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

Richard Phillips' portraits combine lurid imagery with a refined, academic painting style. Valuing critique as an intrinsic part of composition as much as canvas and paint, Phillips takes material from sources like soft porn, advertising, fashion, celebrity culture, and Pop art, translating it into glossy, photorealist works with stylized, close-up figures rendered in heightened color or black and white. His provocative oil paintings—such as Frieze, 2009, a realistic representation of a woman on her back with and issue of the art magazine Frieze inserted into her vagina—reveal how images can be used to distort truth and wield power.

Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)
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