Jorge Macchi, ‘red’, 2012, TWO x TWO

A poetic, uncanny quality permeates much of Macchi’s work, as seen here in his delicate rendering of tape rolls bearing the words FRAGIL and PELIGRO (“fragile” and “danger” in Spanish). Macchi’s use of watercolor deftly conveys the transparent tape and repeated layers of words, and the off-kilter stack takes on an architectural presence.

Argentinian artist Jorge Macchi’s practice encompasses a variety of media, including video, installation, sculpture, sound, and watercolor. A poetic, uncanny quality permeates much of Macchi’s work, as seen here in his delicate rendering of tape rolls bearing the words FRAGIL and PELIGRO (“fragile” and “danger” in Spanish). Macchi’s use of watercolor deftly conveys the transparent tape and repeated layers of words, and the off-kilter stack takes on an architectural presence. Jorge Macchi lives and works in Buenos Aires. Earlier this year, ten large-scale installation works from 2007–2013 were shown in Container - a one-person exhibition at the Kunstmuseum, Lucerne. In 2011, his work was the subject of a survey exhibition, Music Stands Still at the Museum of Contemporary Art (SMAK) in Ghent. His work was represented in the 11th Biennale de Lyon; the 12th Istanbul Biennial; All of this and nothing, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; and Brave New Worlds at the Walker Art Center. In 2005, Jorge Macchi, in collaboration with Edgardo Rudnitzky, represented Argentina at the Venice Biennale.

About Jorge Macchi

Considered one of Argentina’s leading living artists, Jorge Macchi works in a wide range of mediums, from sculpture and painting to installation, video, and conceptual and performance work. Macchi often begins his process with a drawing, giving form to an image that he finds compelling; some images will remain as drawings or watercolor sketches, while others evolve into three-dimensional works or videos. “Everything starts with an image, a sort of surprise in the midst of the linearity of daily experience,” he has said. Macchi is interested in chance and the accidental, and readymades—such as newspaper clippings, city maps, and sheet music—frequently find their way into his work. In Buenos Aires Tour (2003), a collaborative mixed-media work in which Macchi cracked a pane of glass over a city map in order to determine a random path through it, music, sounds, and other materials found along the route make up an alternative tour. He cites John Cage and Jorge-Luis Borges as influences.

Argentine, b. 1963, Buenos Aires, Argentina, based in Buenos Aires, Argentina