Jorinde Voigt, ‘Unumkehrbare Prozesse Studie 1 - Studie 7 (Irreversible Processes Study 1 - 7)’, 2011, Deweer Gallery
Jorinde Voigt, ‘Unumkehrbare Prozesse Studie 1 - Studie 7 (Irreversible Processes Study 1 - 7)’, 2011, Deweer Gallery
Jorinde Voigt, ‘Unumkehrbare Prozesse Studie 1 - Studie 7 (Irreversible Processes Study 1 - 7)’, 2011, Deweer Gallery
Jorinde Voigt, ‘Unumkehrbare Prozesse Studie 1 - Studie 7 (Irreversible Processes Study 1 - 7)’, 2011, Deweer Gallery
Jorinde Voigt, ‘Unumkehrbare Prozesse Studie 1 - Studie 7 (Irreversible Processes Study 1 - 7)’, 2011, Deweer Gallery
Jorinde Voigt, ‘Unumkehrbare Prozesse Studie 1 - Studie 7 (Irreversible Processes Study 1 - 7)’, 2011, Deweer Gallery
Jorinde Voigt, ‘Unumkehrbare Prozesse Studie 1 - Studie 7 (Irreversible Processes Study 1 - 7)’, 2011, Deweer Gallery

Jorinde Voigt
Irreversible Processes Studies 1-7 (2011)

This series contains the 7 studies for the eponymous series of 10 larger works “Irreversible Processes 1 - 10” from the same year 2011.
Both the studies and the larger drawings represent an investigation into the topic of processes that once started cannot be reversed. The process consists of a number of visual elements that are being repeated in a fixed order (sequence), with indication of the duration and with an increase of the number of wide brush strokes.

Concept
Irreversible Processes 1 – 10 (2011)

10-part series
Jorinde Voigt
Mexico City / 2011

This work represents an investigation into the topic of irreversible processes. The notation employs the following elements:

• “Initialisation/ 1st” (blue ink), trigger of the next element:
• “2nd” (red ink, area around the arrowhead of “Initialisation/ 1”), trigger of the next element:
• “3rd” (wide brush strokes in black ink), trigger of the next element:
• “Fields of arrows / Conglomerations of directions”
• “Direction of rotation / Rotation/min.” (red ink)
• “1st min / 2nd min. etc.” development of time in minutes (pencilled-in information about minutes applied to the elements “3rd” (wide brush strokes in black ink) + Fields of arrows / Conglomerations of directions.)
• “Repeat / Year” (brackets drawn using wide black ink strokes around the event “3rd” (wide brush strokes in black ink))

The elements are related to each other in a sequence of development, which only runs in one direction, and is inconceivable in the reverse direction. The chain starts with “Initialisation/ 1st” (blue ink) and the written notation ends with “Fields of arrows / Conglomerations of directions”-6th min. or 7th min., whereby this part of the process could always be continued as an infinite process in/with time. As from the 4th min. directions from neighbouring regions begin to join up and create their own new directions.
“Repeat / Year” sets the whole activity into an annual rhythm, an endless loop–whereby the previous process, as it is infinite, never ends but continues to run parallel, adding together with a specific number of other processes over the course of time.
From the first to the tenth sheet, the number of the element (repeated x-times annually) “3rd” (wide brush strokes in black ink) increases by 1 in each case.

Jorinde Voigt - 1000 Views, Regina Gallery Moscow, Russia, 2011, p. 75

About Jorinde Voigt

Jorinde Voigt creates large-scale graphite drawings, incorporating text and collaged elements to create sweeping and energetic yet, however cryptically, ordered compositions. Voigt’s working method is an attempt to make objective sense of the world, to translate sound, movement, time, form, perception, and science into a single representational scheme. “Drawing allows me to develop maps to many constellations, across many possibilities,” she says. Her works, like Piece for Words and Views XXIX (2012), read like complex codes or lyrical infographics, with seemingly idiosyncratic representations—a dress, a lyre, a hand—mixed with abstract forms and jotted lists, all linked and activated by an expressive flow of lines that recall musical staffs, topographical lines, or electrical circuitry. “My work is like music,” Voigt says. “You can enjoy it without being able to read the score.”

German, b. 1977, Frankfurt, Germany, based in Berlin, Germany