Joseph Beuys, ‘Filzanzug (Felt Suit)’, 1970, Phillips
Joseph Beuys, ‘Filzanzug (Felt Suit)’, 1970, Phillips
Joseph Beuys, ‘Filzanzug (Felt Suit)’, 1970, Phillips
Joseph Beuys, ‘Filzanzug (Felt Suit)’, 1970, Phillips

Property Subject to the Artist's Resale Right (see Conditions of Sale for further information)

Property from an Important German Collection

Jacket: 83.8 x 63.5 cm (32 7/8 x 25 in.)
Trousers: 114.6 x 58.4 cm (45 1/8 x 22 7/8 in.)

Signature: Numbered '1' in black ink on a label affixed to the inside of the jacket (the edition was 100 and 10 hors commerce examples), further signed, titled, dated and numbered by René Block in blue ink on a label affixed to the inside of the box, published by Galerie René Block, Berlin.

Edition Schellmann 26

About Joseph Beuys

A major figure of the postwar German avant-garde, Joseph Beuys viewed art as a vehicle for social change. His performance art "actions" were shamanistic experiences incorporating ritualized movement and sound, as well as non-traditional and even repulsive materials such as fat, felt, honey, blood, and dead animals. For example, in his groundbreaking 1965 performance How to Explain Pictures to a Dead Hare, Beuys—who was covered in symbolic materials such as honey, gold leaf, and iron—explained artworks to a cradled hare. Akin to Andy Warhol in influence but with a more widely (and wildly) ranging formal vocabulary, Beuys counted debate and teaching as part of his art and was a leader in many socioeconomic reform movements.

German, 1921-1986, Krefeld, Germany, based in Düsseldorf, Germany

Group Shows

2018
The Museum Show: Works that were exhibited, owned, sold by - or about - museums (including the gift shops!!!)
2017
ACHENBACH HAGEMEIER, 
Düsseldorf,
2015
ARNDT, 
Singapore,
2014
Montrasio Arte / Km0, 
Innsbruck,
Salvatore Scarpitta • Joseph Beuys. Icon for a transit
View Artist's CV