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Josiah McElheny, ‘Lilly Reich (and Wilhem Wagenfeld), Blue’, Christie's
Josiah McElheny, ‘Lilly Reich (and Wilhem Wagenfeld), Blue’, Christie's
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Josiah McElheny

Lilly Reich (and Wilhem Wagenfeld), Blue

Hand-blown glass, wood, polished lacquer paint and hardware
About the work
Exhibition history
Provenance
C
Christie's
Signature
Lilly Reich (and Wilhem Wagenfeld), Blue
Josiah McElheny
American, b. 1966
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Josiah McElheny explores the limits of memory, knowledge, and history in his elegant glass works. As he explains: “I don’t really believe in history. And I think that, at some level, that’s one subject of some of my work—the fact that history is mutable, which is essentially denying history.” Through his handcrafted glass objects, which he displays in groups and in combination with mirrors, photographs, and text, McElheny evokes our continual striving to construct a coherent understanding of the past and the stories we tell in the process. In McElheny’s work, the infinite reflectivity of glass becomes a metaphor for the act of reflection—on ideas, memories, and history—itself. He was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 2006.

Josiah McElheny, ‘Lilly Reich (and Wilhem Wagenfeld), Blue’, Christie's
Josiah McElheny, ‘Lilly Reich (and Wilhem Wagenfeld), Blue’, Christie's
Save
Save
Share
Share
Save
Save
Share
Share
About the work
Exhibition history
Provenance
C
Christie's
Signature
Lilly Reich (and Wilhem Wagenfeld), Blue
Josiah McElheny
American, b. 1966
Follow

Josiah McElheny explores the limits of memory, knowledge, and history in his elegant glass works. As he explains: “I don’t really believe in history. And I think that, at some level, that’s one subject of some of my work—the fact that history is mutable, which is essentially denying history.” Through his handcrafted glass objects, which he displays in groups and in combination with mirrors, photographs, and text, McElheny evokes our continual striving to construct a coherent understanding of the past and the stories we tell in the process. In McElheny’s work, the infinite reflectivity of glass becomes a metaphor for the act of reflection—on ideas, memories, and history—itself. He was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 2006.

Josiah McElheny

Lilly Reich (and Wilhem Wagenfeld), Blue

Hand-blown glass, wood, polished lacquer paint and hardware