JR, ‘In Kibera Slum, train passage 1’, 2010, Julien's Auctions
JR, ‘In Kibera Slum, train passage 1’, 2010, Julien's Auctions
JR, ‘In Kibera Slum, train passage 1’, 2010, Julien's Auctions

Unframed

Numbered in pencil lower left '510/1000'

In Kibera Slum, Train Passage 1 from JR's Women are Heroes series, is part of his broader 29 Millimetres project. The artist uses a wide-angle 28 mm lens to capture close-up photographs of women's faces, a signature style he has become known for. The up-close, intimate portraits, in this case shows three of the women’s photographs hung in Kibera, a slum in Nairobi, Kenya. The ten photographs JR used for this project in Kibera were so large, they could be viewed easily from Satellite imagery. —Courtesy of Julien’s Auctions

Signature: Signed and stamped lower right

About JR

A semi-anonymous street artist of international renown, JR plasters giant, monochrome photographs of faces in urban centers—on rooftops and walls, in church windows, and along the sides of buses. Calling the street his gallery and “using art to turn the world inside out,” JR delivers a message of social action, telling the stories of the marginalized or voiceless. “Portrait d’une Generation” (2004-06) featured images of young African immigrants hamming for the camera, plastered in the Paris suburbs in the aftermath of major rioting; for his project “Face 2 Face” (2005-07), JR pasted huge images of similarly jovial Jews and Palestinians along the border marking disputed areas between Israel and Palestine. JR describes his practice as a continuation of the “tagging” he did as a young graffiti artist: “I’m tagging faces of persons,” he says. “They are the ones responsible for their image. When the people react to the project, it becomes their project.”

French, b. 1983