Judy Chicago, ‘Through the Flower in Glass’, 2006, CalArts Benefit

This etching and painting on glass is a visual representation of the name of Judy Chicago’s nonprofit, Through the Flower, through which she strives to ensure that the achievements of women are ensconced in our cultural heritage.

The price does not include tax or shipping. After a purchase is confirmed, a representative of CalArts will connect the buyer with the shipping agent. Works will ship from New York or Los Angeles and it is the responsibility of the buyer to pay the shipping agent directly.

For questions about this artwork or the CalArts Benefit Sale, please call (844) 427-8796 to speak with an Artsy Specialist.

All proceeds benefit CalArts. Check should be made payable to CalArts and sent to:

CalArts
Attn: Laura Riggen
24700 McBean Parkway
Valencia, CA 91355

About Judy Chicago

Synonymous with early feminist art, Judy Chicago has been challenging the male-dominated art world since the 1970s. Her characteristically colorful body of work includes paintings, tapestries, sculpture, and mixed-media installations celebrating women’s achievements. Chicago legally assumed the name of her hometown after becoming a widow at the age of 23, symbolizing her lifelong struggle with identity, which she chronicles in Through the Flower: My Struggle as a Woman Artist (1975). In homage to 1,038 women central to the history of Western civilization, Chicago’s most celebrated work, The Dinner Party (1974-79), exemplifies her ongoing endeavor as an artist, educator, and author to elevate women from the margins of society and history. The work—on permanent display at The Brooklyn Museum—features 39 place settings meant to represent famous women from history, from Joan of Arc to Emily Dickinson, with a further 999 names inscribed on the floor.

American, b. 1939, Chicago, Illinois, based in Belen, New Mexico