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Jules Hardouin-Mansart, ‘Le bassin de Latone (Latona's Fountain)’, Château de Versailles
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Le bassin de Latone (Latona's Fountain)

Location
Versailles
About the work
Exhibition history
Château de Versailles
Versailles

Collection: Château de Versailles, Versailles

Collection: Château de Versailles, Versailles

Image rights
Images courtesy of Château de Versailles
Jules Hardouin-Mansart
French, 1646–1708
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Best known for redesigning and expanding the great palace of Versailles, French architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart is thought to epitomize the French Baroque. Hardouin-Mansart trained under his great uncle Francois Mansart, a famous 17th-century architect whose name he also assumed. Made official architect to King Louis XIV in 1685, Hardouin-Mansart began his work at Versailles shortly after, building the Hall of Mirrors and the Orangerie—among other components of the palace—in a lavish manner that expressed the king’s great wealth and power. Throughout his lifetime Hardouin-Mansart built a host of other public buildings, churches, and homes.

Jules Hardouin-Mansart, ‘Le bassin de Latone (Latona's Fountain)’, Château de Versailles
Navigate left
Jules Hardouin-Mansart, ‘Le bassin de Latone (Latona's Fountain)’, Château de Versailles
Navigate right
Save
Save
Share
Share
Save
Save
Share
Share
About the work
Exhibition history
Château de Versailles
Versailles

Collection: Château de Versailles, Versailles

Collection: Château de Versailles, Versailles

Image rights
Images courtesy of Château de Versailles
Jules Hardouin-Mansart
French, 1646–1708
Follow

Best known for redesigning and expanding the great palace of Versailles, French architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart is thought to epitomize the French Baroque. Hardouin-Mansart trained under his great uncle Francois Mansart, a famous 17th-century architect whose name he also assumed. Made official architect to King Louis XIV in 1685, Hardouin-Mansart began his work at Versailles shortly after, building the Hall of Mirrors and the Orangerie—among other components of the palace—in a lavish manner that expressed the king’s great wealth and power. Throughout his lifetime Hardouin-Mansart built a host of other public buildings, churches, and homes.

Le bassin de Latone (Latona's Fountain)

Location
Versailles