Julian Charrière, ‘Objects in Mirror Might Be Closer Than They Appear’, 2016/2017, Outset Benefit Auction
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Objects in Mirror Might Be Closer Than They Appear, 2016/2017

Video, sound
Edition 3/5 + 2AP
This is part of a limited edition set.
Bidding closed
About the work
Outset Benefit Auction

From the Catalogue:
Presented as a double-channel video installation with a semi-transparent mirror …

Medium
Video/Film/Animation
Signature
Certificate of Authenticity
Image rights
Donated by Jan Fischer, Munich
Julian Charrière
Swiss, b. 1987
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In his research-based practice, Julian Charrière uses sculptural objects and images—both moving and still—to explore the connections between human activity, ecology, the environment, and time. Working in such far-flung locales as Kazakhstan and the Southern Cone, the Berlin-based artist performs site-specific actions inspired by the social and natural sciences, using biological and earthen substances as materials. “I use some scientific methods, but I would describe it more as an archeologist or geologist,” he has said. “I go into the field and get inspired by what I see, then I bring things back to the studio and do work.” A former student of Olafur Eliasson, Charrière focuses on investigations of the natural world, revealing the profound force exerted by humans and the environment on one another and highlighting how ecological systems can exhibit traces of human energy.

Julius von Bismarck
German, b. 1983
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Julius von Bismarck is a multi-media artist using everything from photography and video to installation and performance, in works that confront human perception and experience. For Versuch unter Kreisen (Experiment Among Circles) (2012), conceived while he was a [email protected] resident, von Bismarck created a system that fluctuates between chaos and order. He hung industrial lamps from the ceiling, connected to motors that spin them in circles at different rates, synchronizing on every 75th rotation. In projects from a video in which he literally paints a Mexican landscape to his residency, during Art Basel Unlimited in 2015, inside a revolving concrete disk outfitted with a bed and desk, von Bismark works to develop new ways of thinking about physical and social constraints.

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Julian Charrière, ‘Objects in Mirror Might Be Closer Than They Appear’, 2016/2017, Outset Benefit Auction
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About the work
Outset Benefit Auction

From the Catalogue:
Presented as a double-channel video installation with a semi-transparent mirror in the center, Objects in mirror might be closer than they appear is a new film by Julian Charrière and Julius von Bismarck. It alternates between found footage from NASA and other archives, showing some of the first …

Medium
Video/Film/Animation
Signature
Certificate of Authenticity
Image rights
Donated by Jan Fischer, Munich
Julian Charrière
Swiss, b. 1987
Follow

In his research-based practice, Julian Charrière uses sculptural objects and images—both moving and still—to explore the connections between human activity, ecology, the environment, and time. Working in such far-flung locales as Kazakhstan and the Southern Cone, the Berlin-based artist performs site-specific actions inspired by the social and natural sciences, using biological and earthen substances as materials. “I use some scientific methods, but I would describe it more as an archeologist or geologist,” he has said. “I go into the field and get inspired by what I see, then I bring things back to the studio and do work.” A former student of Olafur Eliasson, Charrière focuses on investigations of the natural world, revealing the profound force exerted by humans and the environment on one another and highlighting how ecological systems can exhibit traces of human energy.

Julius von Bismarck
German, b. 1983
Follow

Julius von Bismarck is a multi-media artist using everything from photography and video to installation and performance, in works that confront human perception and experience. For Versuch unter Kreisen (Experiment Among Circles) (2012), conceived while he was a [email protected] resident, von Bismarck created a system that fluctuates between chaos and order. He hung industrial lamps from the ceiling, connected to motors that spin them in circles at different rates, synchronizing on every 75th rotation. In projects from a video in which he literally paints a Mexican landscape to his residency, during Art Basel Unlimited in 2015, inside a revolving concrete disk outfitted with a bed and desk, von Bismark works to develop new ways of thinking about physical and social constraints.

Objects in Mirror Might Be Closer Than They Appear, 2016/2017

Video, sound
Edition 3/5 + 2AP
This is part of a limited edition set.
Bidding closed
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