Kahn & Selesnick, ‘The Oracle ’, 2010, Carrie Haddad Gallery
Kahn & Selesnick, ‘The Oracle ’, 2010, Carrie Haddad Gallery
Kahn & Selesnick, ‘The Oracle ’, 2010, Carrie Haddad Gallery
Kahn & Selesnick, ‘The Oracle ’, 2010, Carrie Haddad Gallery
Kahn & Selesnick, ‘The Oracle ’, 2010, Carrie Haddad Gallery
Kahn & Selesnick, ‘The Oracle ’, 2010, Carrie Haddad Gallery

archival pigment print
10 x 10 inches unframed, 13 x 13 inches in white frame

This contemporary, surrealist style photograph was printed by the artistic duo, Kahn & Selesnick, in 2010. The print is part of their 'Mar: Adrift on the Hourglass Sea' series which features a female protagonist in an extraterrestrial world. The character, dressed in a skin-tight blue suit, is alone on this foreign, barren planet blanketed with brown dirt and expansive sand dunes. Here the blue suited woman is standing above a half-sphere platform looking down at a identical scene which under closer inspection seems to be a mental projection that decreases in size, similar to a Russian nesting doll. The lone woman stands below a star filled dark blue sky, possibly pondering a way to survive the barren desert-like landscape. With this imagery, the artists entice an imaginative narrative where the viewer is left to conjure up their own story. The print is compliment with a clean white frame, measuring 13 x 13 inches.

About the series:
"Mars: Adrift on the Hourglass Sea" is Kahn and Selesnick’s first project to feature a female protagonist; a woman finds herself alone in a wasteland that appears to be Mars. It is uncertain how she arrived in this place, via spacecraft, through a fold in the space-time continuum or perhaps the landscape is a mental projection. Either way, it is clear that she has escaped an unnamed catastrophe on Earth. In a series of hallucinatory episodes she simultaneously explores the planet and builds a mock-life for herself from a combination of high-tech and stone-age materials. Mars is revealed to have ruined artifacts and monuments from a previous, or perhaps future, civilization. The remains of massive stone listening devices are littered about the landscape, leading us to wonder: is this a colony that has collapsed and lost touch with earth? How did its occupants become stranded? Or are these the nocturnal imaginings of a post-apocalyptic survivor?

About the artists:
About the work:
The ultimate storytellers, who have been showing with Carrie Haddad Gallery for more than 20 years, are Nicholas Kahn and Richard Selesnick of Kahn & Selesnick, who met at Washington University in St. Louis in the 1970’s. Their initial collaboration started in Truro, MA with real film and a box camera, (that belonged to Kahn's father and was actually used during the war), a real darkroom, stacks of cotton rag paper, and a xerox machine set on sepia tone. The first few series documented an invented history about “The Royal Excavation Corps” and their experiences with a shaman, experimental wings for solo flying, psychedelic honey and all sorts of adventures shot like an old movie. Eight series later, Kahn & Selesnick now shoot with digital cameras and alter them on the computer. The results are stunning and still have the appearance of an era long ago. One of their most interesting series, Truppe Fledermaus (Bat Troupe), explores magic realism and documents a group a performers dressed as bats, “greenmen” and “death dancers” who wander the countryside performing only for animals. There are many hand-made elements in Kahn & Selesnick's work—imaginative costumes, stage sets, carved clay bat heads and figures, as well as drawings.

Series: Mars: Adrift on the Hourglass Sea

About Kahn & Selesnick