Karen Halverson, ‘Davis Gulch, Lake Powell, Utah’, 1995, Robert Klein Gallery
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Karen Halverson

Davis Gulch, Lake Powell, Utah, 1995

Archival digital pigment print
This is part of a limited edition set.
40 × 30 in
101.6 × 76.2 cm
Edition of 25 inclusive of all sizes
Contact for price
50 × 40 in
127 × 101.6 cm
Edition of 25 inclusive of all sizes
Contact for price
24 × 20 in
61 × 50.8 cm
Edition of 25 inclusive of all sizes
Contact for price
Location
Boston
Have a question? Visit our help center.
About the work
Karen Halverson
American, b. 1941
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Karen Halverson’s photographs document the relationship between human construction and dramatic landscapes, particularly in the American West. Halverson first became enamored with the West during a road trip to Stanford University in the late 1950s. She returned to the Northeast for her post-graduate studies, and studied photography with Garry Winogrand and Joel Meyerowitz in New York. Her photographs capture the striking landscapes of places such as the Utah desert, Santa Monica Mountains, and Iceland, and include traces of human activity—a sign, building, or car—that interrupt the natural environment. “I was drawn to human artifacts in the landscape—perhaps in reaction to the tradition of seeing landscape as ‘pure,’ or because human artifacts establish a sense of time—the here and now,” Halverson has said.

Karen Halverson, ‘Davis Gulch, Lake Powell, Utah’, 1995, Robert Klein Gallery
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
Karen Halverson
American, b. 1941
Follow

Karen Halverson’s photographs document the relationship between human construction and dramatic landscapes, particularly in the American West. Halverson first became enamored with the West during a road trip to Stanford University in the late 1950s. She returned to the Northeast for her post-graduate studies, and studied photography with Garry Winogrand and Joel Meyerowitz in New York. Her photographs capture the striking landscapes of places such as the Utah desert, Santa Monica Mountains, and Iceland, and include traces of human activity—a sign, building, or car—that interrupt the natural environment. “I was drawn to human artifacts in the landscape—perhaps in reaction to the tradition of seeing landscape as ‘pure,’ or because human artifacts establish a sense of time—the here and now,” Halverson has said.

Karen Halverson

Davis Gulch, Lake Powell, Utah, 1995

Archival digital pigment print
This is part of a limited edition set.
40 × 30 in
101.6 × 76.2 cm
Edition of 25 inclusive of all sizes
Contact for price
50 × 40 in
127 × 101.6 cm
Edition of 25 inclusive of all sizes
Contact for price
24 × 20 in
61 × 50.8 cm
Edition of 25 inclusive of all sizes
Contact for price
Location
Boston
Have a question? Visit our help center.
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