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Käthe Kollwitz

Selbstbildnis (Self-Portrait), 1937-1939

Bronze with brown patina and Jura marble base
14 3/5 × 9 3/10 × 11 3/5 in
37.1 × 23.5 × 29.5 cm
Bidding closed
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About the work
Bibliography
Provenance
P
Phillips

Property from the Estate of Ann Nisenson, Los Angeles and Santa Barbara

Height with Base: 18 3/4 …

Read more

Property from the Estate of Ann Nisenson, Los Angeles and Santa Barbara

Height with Base: 18 3/4 in. (47.6 cm)
One of three located lifetime casts, up to eight were cast in total

From the Catalogue:
We would like to give sincere thanks to Dr. Annette Seeler for her thorough research and confirmation that this example is …

Read more
Käthe Kollwitz
German, 1867–1945
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Considered one of Germany’s most important early 20th-century artists, Käthe Kollwitz captured the hardships suffered by the working class in drawings, paintings, and prints. Themes of war and poverty dominate Kollwitz’s oeuvre, with images of women grieving dead children a particularly important and recurring theme—an experience that Kollwitz suffered herself when her son died in WWI, influencing her decision to become a Socialist. Kollwitz’s unflinching exploration of human suffering amounted to a searing indictment of social conditions in Germany. In 1936, the Nazis declared Kollwitz’s art “degenerate” and her artworks were removed from museums.

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About the work
Bibliography
Provenance
P
Phillips

Property from the Estate of Ann Nisenson, Los Angeles and Santa Barbara

Height with Base: 18 3/4 …

Read more

Property from the Estate of Ann Nisenson, Los Angeles and Santa Barbara

Height with Base: 18 3/4 in. (47.6 cm)
One of three located lifetime casts, up to eight were cast in total

From the Catalogue:
We would like to give sincere thanks to Dr. Annette Seeler for her thorough research and confirmation that this example is …

Read more
Käthe Kollwitz
German, 1867–1945
Follow

Considered one of Germany’s most important early 20th-century artists, Käthe Kollwitz captured the hardships suffered by the working class in drawings, paintings, and prints. Themes of war and poverty dominate Kollwitz’s oeuvre, with images of women grieving dead children a particularly important and recurring theme—an experience that Kollwitz suffered herself when her son died in WWI, influencing her decision to become a Socialist. Kollwitz’s unflinching exploration of human suffering amounted to a searing indictment of social conditions in Germany. In 1936, the Nazis declared Kollwitz’s art “degenerate” and her artworks were removed from museums.

Käthe Kollwitz

Selbstbildnis (Self-Portrait), 1937-1939

Bronze with brown patina and Jura marble base
14 3/5 × 9 3/10 × 11 3/5 in
37.1 × 23.5 × 29.5 cm
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
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Self-Portrait