Kathryn Andrews, ‘HOBO (UNTITLED)’, 2014, TWO x TWO

estimated retail value: $25,000

In this beautifully crafted, but thoroughly unsettling work, Andrews uses an aluminum frame to encase (and display) pills, beans, and cigarettes in the upper section and an image of a clown below. The work becomes not just a commentary on the role of the clown as a cultural symbol, but offers us a way to think about perception, identity, and the nature of what is for show and what must be hidden.

Pristinely fabricated forms combined with pop culture images and artifacts characterize much of Kathryn Andrews work. In this beautifully crafted, but thoroughly unsettling work, Andrews uses an aluminum frame to encase (and display) pills, beans, and cigarettes in the upper section and an image of a clown below. Here, the clown is removed from the realm of children’s entertainment, and the reality of his life as an adult is thrust at the viewer through his droopy gaze, wig cap (minus the wig), smeared make-up, and the food and drugs hovering above his head. The work becomes not just a commentary on the role of the clown as a cultural symbol, but offers us a way to think about perception, identity, and the nature of what is for show and what must be hidden. Andrews lives and works in Los Angeles. In 2013, she was the subject of a solo exhibition at Museum Ludwig, Cologne. Her work has been included in exhibitions at Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; ICA, Philadelphia; CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, San Francisco; MoCA, North Miami; and MoCA, Los Angeles.

gallery website: www.davidkordanskygallery.com

About Kathryn Andrews

Los Angeles–based Kathryn Andrews finds inspiration for her wicked ready-mades of chrome-plated metal in her city’s collisions of shine and grit—its Hollywood props, clown suits, and balloons, she says. The artist looks to expose and deconstruct the excesses of capitalism, which often includes the spectacle of the established art market. Her work, which contains inflections of pop art and minimalism, has been compared to Duchamp’s ready-mades. To create her sculptures, Andrews will often rent materials from Southern California celebrity-themed shops—a t-shirt worn by Brad Pitt, for example, or a wedding ring donned by Ashton Kutcher. In using these props, whose value comes only through their proximity to celebrity, Andrews troubles the idea of precious materials. Upon returning the rented props, the assemblages are torn down, a sly evasion of the art world’s investment in permanent pieces and tangible products.

American, b. 1973

Solo Shows

2015
Brussels,
Kathryn Andrews - Trinity and Powers: In Search of Breadfruit

Group Shows

2014
ACHENBACH HAGEMEIER, 
Düsseldorf,