Katsushika Hokusai, ‘Turban Shell Hall from "36 Views of Mt. Fuji"’, ca. 1832, Egenolf Gallery Japanese Prints & Drawing

Visitors on the viewing platform of the third story of the Sazaidô are transfixed at the sight of Mt. Fuji rising across the marshes. This image was chosen for the cover image of 1998’s Hokusai: Bridging East and West, edited by Matthi Forrer, but this is an earlier impression than the shown Pulverer example. As explained by Matthi Forrer (1991), earlier impressions have black rather than grey as the colors of the pilgrim’s backpacks, and the lower area next to the man dressed in dark blue is black rather than grey. Also, the red publisher’s mark and censor’s seal are present. There is also woodgrain visible in the grey block used for the marsh. Excellent impression and color; very good condition. Center fold.

Signature: zen Hokusai Iitsu hitsu

Publisher: Eijudo

See Forrer’s “Hokusai”, plate 22. Cover image and plate 9 for “Hokusai: Bridging East and West” (1998) curated by Matthi Forrer.

About Katsushika Hokusai

Adhering to a common Japanese practice with extreme frequency, Katsushika Hokusai transitioned between upwards of 30 pseudonyms throughout his career, each correlating to a different period or style. Despite the many changes, his surname prevails—Hokusai—which unites the surplus of monikers into a single legacy for the artist, printmaker, and ukiyo-e painter. In his early work, Hokusai depicted the traditional subject matter of ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings, Kabuki actors; however, he monumentally revolutionized the medium by shifting his focus to landscapes and images of daily life in Japan. Hokusai is best-known for his woodblock series, “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji” (1831), which mastered the landscape while exploring the relationship between man and environment, and contained the The Great Wave off Kanagawa, which remains one of the most universally recognized icons of Japanese art.

Japanese, 1760-1849, Tokyo, Japan, based in Tokyo, Japan