Save
Save
share
Share
Save
Save
share
Share

Keith Calhoun

“The Quilt” made by members/ inmates and caregivers in the Angola Hospice program, 2013

location
New Orleans
About the work
Articles
Keith Calhoun
American, b. 1955
Follow

New Orleans native Keith Calhoun, who started his career as a cameraman for the public television station KCET in California, is regarded as one of the Ninth Ward’s most valuable documentarians. When a major archive of photographs by Calhoun and his wife and longtime collaborator, Chandra McCormick, were destroyed during Hurricane Katrina, a prominent historian remarked it was a cultural tragedy of the same ilk as the ruination of Fats Domino’s piano. Since the early 1980s, Calhoun and McCormick have recorded the African American experience in New Orleans and its surrounding areas, creating stark black-and-white portraits of sweet potato harvesters and sugarcane workers, religious services and barrooms. “We documented the soul of the city,” Calhoun has said. “We documented vanishing Louisiana.” Recently, the duo launched a large-scale project that directly connects the contemporary prison system to slavery.

Save
Save
share
Share
Save
Save
share
Share
About the work
Articles
Keith Calhoun
American, b. 1955
Follow

New Orleans native Keith Calhoun, who started his career as a cameraman for the public television station KCET in California, is regarded as one of the Ninth Ward’s most valuable documentarians. When a major archive of photographs by Calhoun and his wife and longtime collaborator, Chandra McCormick, were destroyed during Hurricane Katrina, a prominent historian remarked it was a cultural tragedy of the same ilk as the ruination of Fats Domino’s piano. Since the early 1980s, Calhoun and McCormick have recorded the African American experience in New Orleans and its surrounding areas, creating stark black-and-white portraits of sweet potato harvesters and sugarcane workers, religious services and barrooms. “We documented the soul of the city,” Calhoun has said. “We documented vanishing Louisiana.” Recently, the duo launched a large-scale project that directly connects the contemporary prison system to slavery.

Keith Calhoun

“The Quilt” made by members/ inmates and caregivers in the Angola Hospice program, 2013

location
New Orleans
Other works from Prospect.3: Notes for Now
Other works by Keith Calhoun
Other works from Prospect New Orleans
Related works
Most Similar
Street Photography
Artist as Ethnographer