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Lot 180

Basquiat, Keith Haring, Rammellzee & Lady Pink, ART/New York 1984:
Rare historic announcement form for “Graffiti/Post-Graffiti,” a historic 30 minute videotape featuring interviews with Jean-Michel Basquiat, Fred Brathwaite (fab Five Freddy), Futura 2000, Crash, Lady Pink, Rammellzee, Charlie Ahearn, Patti Astor, …

Medium
Signature
Not signed
Frame
Not included
Image rights
Listing images copyright Lot 180 LLC

Bridging the gap between the art world and the street, Keith Haring rose to prominence in the early 1980s with his graffiti drawings made in the subways and on the sidewalks of New York City. Combining the appeal of cartoons with the raw energy of Art Brut artists like Jean DuBuffet, Haring developed a distinct pop-graffiti aesthetic centered on fluid, bold outlines against a dense, rhythmic overspread of imagery like that of babies, barking dogs, flying saucers, hearts, and Mickey Mouse. In his subway drawings and murals, Haring explored themes of exploitation, subjugation, drug abuse, and rising fears of nuclear holocaust, which became increasingly apocalyptic after his AIDS diagnosis. Alongside Jean-Michel Basquiat, Kenny Scharf, and Jenny Holzer, Haring is regarded as a leading figure in New York East Village Art scene in the 1970s and '80s.

High auction record
$6.5m, Sotheby's, 2017
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2019
Keith Haring - Party of Life / GenevaOpera Gallery
Keith HaringCentre for Fine Arts (BOZAR)
2014
Keith Haring: The Political Linede Young Museum
View all

A poet, musician, and graffiti prodigy in late-1970s New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat had honed his signature painting style of obsessive scribbling, elusive symbols and diagrams, and mask-and-skull imagery by the time he was 20. “I don’t think about art while I work,” he once said. “I think about life.” Basquiat drew his subjects from his own Caribbean heritage—his father was Haitian and his mother of Puerto Rican descent—and a convergence of African-American, African, and Aztec cultural histories with Classical themes and contemporary heroes like athletes and musicians. Often associated with Neo-expressionism, Basquiat received massive acclaim in only a few short years, showing alongside artists like Julian Schnabel, David Salle, and Francesco Clemente. In 1983, he met Andy Warhol, who would come to be a mentor and idol. The two collaborated on a series of paintings before Warhol’s death in 1987, followed by Basquiat’s own untimely passing a year later.

High auction record
$110.5m, Sotheby's, 2017
Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Guggenheim Museum, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao
Selected exhibitions
2019
Jean-Michel BasquiatFondation Louis Vuitton
Basquiat’s “Defacement”: The Untold StoryGuggenheim Museum
2015
Basquiat: The Unknown NotebooksBrooklyn Museum
View all
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2019
RAMMELLZEE: The Private Collection of the MagistrateMana Contemporary
2018
RAMMΣLLZΣΣ: A Roll of DiceLazinc
2016
Scratches, Spit and VinegarCrown Point Press
View all
LADY PINK

Sandra Fabara, aka, Lady Pink, was born in Ecuador in 1964, raised in Queens, New York, and studied at the High School of Art & Design in Manhattan. While a student there, she met a group of graffiti artists and began writing at age fifteen. She was soon well known as the only prominent female capable of competing with the boys in the graffiti subculture. Lady Pink painted subway trains from the years 1979-1985. She appeared in theaters in the starring role of Rose in Charlie Ahearn’s 1983 film Wild Style and quickly acquired hip-hop, cult figure status. That same year, Lady Pink was featured in the landmark Graffiti exhibition at the West 57th Street Sidney Janis Gallery where she met the elite collectors of the Artworld.

Lady Pink’s canvases are in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, New York and the Groningen Museum, Holland. They were featured in the major exhibitions “Art in the Streets” at the LA MOCA and “Graffiti” at the Brooklyn Museum. Lady Pink continues to mature as an artist, selling work internationally and producing ambitious murals commissioned for universities, corporations and institutions. In 2011,Pink's art has also been seen on television commercials for the search engine BING.

Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2019
Beyond the Streets NYCBEYOND THE STREETS
2018
Janette Beckman, The Mash UpFahey/Klein Gallery
2017
CITY AS CANVAS: NEW YORK CITY GRAFFITI FROM THE 70S & 80SIndianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
View all
LADY PINK

Basquiat, Keith Haring 1980s graffiti announcement (Graffiti/Post Graffiti), 1984

Offset printed announcement
11 × 7 in
27.9 × 17.8 cm
.
$1,450
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L
Lot 180

Basquiat, Keith Haring, Rammellzee & Lady Pink, ART/New York 1984:
Rare historic announcement …

Medium
Signature
Not signed
Frame
Not included
Image rights
Listing images copyright Lot 180 LLC

Bridging the gap between the art world and the street, Keith Haring rose to prominence in the early 1980s with his graffiti drawings made in the subways and on the sidewalks of New York City. Combining the appeal of cartoons with the raw energy of Art Brut artists like Jean DuBuffet, Haring developed a distinct pop-graffiti aesthetic centered on fluid, bold outlines against a dense, rhythmic overspread of imagery like that of babies, barking dogs, flying saucers, hearts, and Mickey Mouse. In his subway drawings and murals, Haring explored themes of exploitation, subjugation, drug abuse, and rising fears of nuclear holocaust, which became increasingly apocalyptic after his AIDS diagnosis. Alongside Jean-Michel Basquiat, Kenny Scharf, and Jenny Holzer, Haring is regarded as a leading figure in New York East Village Art scene in the 1970s and '80s.

High auction record
$6.5m, Sotheby's, 2017
Blue-chip
Represented by internationally recognized galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)

A poet, musician, and graffiti prodigy in late-1970s New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat had honed his signature painting style of obsessive scribbling, elusive symbols and diagrams, and mask-and-skull imagery by the time he was 20. “I don’t think about art while I work,” he once said. “I think about life.” Basquiat drew his subjects from his own Caribbean heritage—his father was Haitian and his mother of Puerto Rican descent—and a convergence of African-American, African, and Aztec cultural histories with Classical themes and contemporary heroes like athletes and musicians. Often associated with Neo-expressionism, Basquiat received massive acclaim in only a few short years, showing alongside artists like Julian Schnabel, David Salle, and Francesco Clemente. In 1983, he met Andy Warhol, who would come to be a mentor and idol. The two collaborated on a series of paintings before Warhol’s death in 1987, followed by Basquiat’s own untimely passing a year later.

High auction record
$110.5m, Sotheby's, 2017
Collected by major museums
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Guggenheim Museum, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao
Selected exhibitions (3)
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)
LADY PINK

Sandra Fabara, aka, Lady Pink, was born in Ecuador in 1964, raised in Queens, New York, and studied at the High School of Art & Design in Manhattan. While a student there, she met a group of graffiti artists and began writing at age fifteen. She was soon well known as the only prominent female capable of competing with the boys in the graffiti subculture. Lady Pink painted subway trains from the years 1979-1985. She appeared in theaters in the starring role of Rose in Charlie Ahearn’s 1983 film Wild Style and quickly acquired hip-hop, cult figure status. That same year, Lady Pink was featured in the landmark Graffiti exhibition at the West 57th Street Sidney Janis Gallery where she met the elite collectors of the Artworld.

Lady Pink’s canvases are in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, New York and the Groningen Museum, Holland. They were featured in the major exhibitions “Art in the Streets” at the LA MOCA and “Graffiti” at the Brooklyn Museum. Lady Pink continues to mature as an artist, selling work internationally and producing ambitious murals commissioned for universities, corporations and institutions. In 2011,Pink's art has also been seen on television commercials for the search engine BING.

Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works by Keith Haring
Other works from Lot 180
Related works