Keith Haring, ‘The Story of Red and Blue’, 1989, Outset: Benefit Auction 2017

Sheet 16 (from a set of 21 prints)

From the Catalogue:
Haring understood something of his debt to sixties culture- its public and popular culture and thought, that is, as opposed to its art. On the latter front, he was selective: he adored Andy Warhol, but he was skeptical of the “overrationalization” he found in Minimal and Conceptual art, and worked partly in reaction against it. Of the events and ideas that flowed through American everyday consciousness in the sixties, on the other hand, he wrote, in that same letter to Leary: “I was born in 1958, so while I was growing up I was only aware of the events in the early Sixties through a strange mixture of sources... television, Life magazine pictorial essays, and some associations with enlightened relatives. I was very absorbed and interested, however, and I think affected at a time when my personality and ideology were in their most ‘affectable’ or impressionable stages.”
Source: Haring.com, David Frankel, American Beauty

Signature: Signed

About Keith Haring

Bridging the gap between the art world and the street, Keith Haring rose to prominence in the early 1980s with his graffiti drawings made in the subways and on the sidewalks of New York City. Combining the appeal of cartoons with the raw energy of Art Brut artists like Jean DuBuffet, Haring developed a distinct pop-graffiti aesthetic centered on fluid, bold outlines against a dense, rhythmic overspread of imagery like that of babies, barking dogs, flying saucers, hearts, and Mickey Mouse. In his subway drawings and murals, Haring explored themes of exploitation, subjugation, drug abuse, and rising fears of nuclear holocaust, which became increasingly apocalyptic after his AIDS diagnosis. Alongside Jean-Michel Basquiat, Kenny Scharf, and Jenny Holzer, Haring is regarded as a leading figure in New York East Village Art scene in the 1970s and '80s.

American, 1958-1990, Reading, Pennsylvania, based in New York, New York