Photo: Casey Dorobek

Medium
Image rights
Courtesy of Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York

Using elements of electronic circuitry, American artist and scientist Kelly Heaton tries to mirror the process of the creation of life. Through these works, as well as through more traditional practices that incorporate kinetic sculpture, time-based narrative, and spirituality, she combines the natural and manmade—like handmade electronic fireflies resting on harvested tree branches—to raise questions of ownership, creation, and the very essence of life. She has also explored the often-overlooked effects of technology in everyday objects, creating coats made of “skinned” electronic Elmo dolls or networks of deconstructed Furby toys. Despite being from the recent past, these quickly outmoded technological elements are a reminder of the fleeting nature of progress—as what’s cutting-edge one decade becomes landfill fodder the next.

Selected exhibitions
2018
Reprise: Summer Show 2018Ronald Feldman Gallery
2015
Kelly Heaton: PollinationRonald Feldman Gallery
2012
Kelly Heaton: The Parallel SeriesRonald Feldman Gallery
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Kinetic Study of Bees No. 3, 2015

Brass, steel, and electronics
31 × 10 × 24 in
78.7 × 25.4 × 61 cm
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Location
New York
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Photo: Casey Dorobek

Medium
Image rights
Courtesy of Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York

Using elements of electronic circuitry, American artist and scientist Kelly Heaton tries to mirror the process of the creation of life. Through these works, as well as through more traditional practices that incorporate kinetic sculpture, time-based narrative, and spirituality, she combines the natural and manmade—like handmade electronic fireflies resting on harvested tree branches—to raise questions of ownership, creation, and the very essence of life. She has also explored the often-overlooked effects of technology in everyday objects, creating coats made of “skinned” electronic Elmo dolls or networks of deconstructed Furby toys. Despite being from the recent past, these quickly outmoded technological elements are a reminder of the fleeting nature of progress—as what’s cutting-edge one decade becomes landfill fodder the next.

Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works from Kelly Heaton: Pollination
Other works by Kelly Heaton
Other works from Ronald Feldman Gallery
Related works
Related artists
Alexander Reben
Susan Baus
Henry Mandell
American