Kenneth Noland, ‘PK-0204’, 1979, Heather James Fine Art: Benefit Auction 2016
Kenneth Noland, ‘PK-0204’, 1979, Heather James Fine Art: Benefit Auction 2016
Kenneth Noland, ‘PK-0204’, 1979, Heather James Fine Art: Benefit Auction 2016
Kenneth Noland, ‘PK-0204’, 1979, Heather James Fine Art: Benefit Auction 2016

Early exposure to the work of Henri Matisse proved to be a formative moment for the American artist Kenneth Noland, who went on to develop a style that he called “color structure.” PK-0204 (1979) is a post-painterly abstraction on handmade paper, the rough gradations and muted tones retreating diagonally across the page. His work belongs to the collections of the Kunsthaus, Zurich, the Tate Gallery, London, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

Framed: 33.5 x 28.75 in.

General Electric Corporate Collection
Heather James Fine Art

About Kenneth Noland

An innovative colorist, Kenneth Noland began his career as an Abstract Expressionist, became one of the first practitioners of Color Field painting as part of the Washington Color School, and ultimately embraced a Minimalist approach that comprised vivid color and simple geometric shapes. His most iconic works are subtly direct compositions of chevrons, concentric circles, stripes, and diamonds, such as Pent (1966). Noland also pioneered the use of shaped canvases, painting on increasingly asymmetrical canvases that rendered the edge of equal compositional importance to the center.

American, 1924-2010, Asheville, North Carolina