Kim Keever, ‘Abstract 20684 ’, 2015, Winston Wächter Fine Art

Trained as a thermal engineer (having worked on several NASA projects), photographer Kim Keever fuses the images of his childhood fantasy with his knowledge of science and physics. His exploration into his unique process began by trying to physically recreate the imagery of his memories. By constructing intricate landscapes inside a water-filled aquarium, he was able to create the mysterious atmosphere of the mind. Inspired by memories of his father mixing condensed milk and water Keever used his background in science as starting point for recreating the ephemeral. As Keever continued to explore, his photography evolved from atmospheric landscapes to bold abstract compositions, allowing the materials to create expressions. Bright pigments hang weightless, captured in digital form. Keever states, “the idea has become a machine that makes the art”. Keever’s work is included in numerous collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York, Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC.

About Kim Keever

Initially, Kim Keever’s lush, large-scale photographs of moody landscapes look like they were produced by the Hudson River School painters or the French or German Romantics: sublime, vast, and timeless. Upon closer inspection, cracks in the illusionism appear, as Keever’s landscapes are actually detailed miniature scenes that he builds himself, places in a 200-gallon tank, submerges in water, and photographs. Keever is interested in the combination of artifice and naturalism in landscape painting and how this has shaped our perception of nature.

American, b. 1955, New York, New York