Kishio Suga 菅木志雄, ‘Foot of Mountain’, 1993, Japan Society Benefit Auction 2016

As a key proponent of Mono-ha (School of Things), Kishio Suga creates site-specific, physical and conceptual structures out of everyday materials to explore the interrelation between things and space. Much of his early work was ephemeral and no longer exists. This rare extant sculpture exhibits Suga's longstanding interest in interiority and exteriority, balance and boundary: here, two stones connected through a circular opening by wire rest upon an inverted wooden "T." The juxtaposition of these materials calls attention to their distinctive qualities, while the floating metal wire challenges perception and expectations. For his first solo exhibition in the U.S., Suga will recreate his 1973 installation "Placement of Condition" at Dia: Chelsea this fall.

Please note: After bidding closes on Artsy, bids on this piece will be transferred and executed at the live auction component of the Japan Society Benefit & Auction on the evening of November 2, 2016.

Signature: Signed.

About Kishio Suga 菅木志雄

Kishio Suga is a leading figure of the Mono-ha movement—Japanese for “the school of things”— known for their radical use of elemental materials. He studied oil painting, but is best known for his multi-media sculptures, installations, and spatial interventions. Suga describes his process as one of “re-conceptualization” and of discovering the “unfamiliar phrasing” of what appears familiar in day-to-day life. He favors the use of commonly found-though-unconventional artistic materials, like timber, rock, sand, concrete, and empty space. Using this limited array, the artist explores the relationships and potential associations that arise from combining objects. Suga also makes works on paper with more frequency at the beginning of his career.

Japanese, b. 1944