Kysa Johnson, ‘Blow Up 318’, ArtStar
Kysa Johnson, ‘Blow Up 318’, ArtStar
Kysa Johnson, ‘Blow Up 318’, ArtStar
Kysa Johnson, ‘Blow Up 318’, ArtStar
Kysa Johnson, ‘Blow Up 318’, ArtStar
Kysa Johnson, ‘Blow Up 318’, ArtStar
Kysa Johnson, ‘Blow Up 318’, ArtStar

ABOUT THIS PIECE: Kysa Johnson's work explores patterns in nature that exist at the extremes of scale. Using micro patterns in nature such as subatomic decay & patterns (the signature pathways that are created when unstable subatomic particles decay into stable ones) maps of the universe, the molecular structure of pollutants or diseases and their cures (among others,) it depicts a physical reality that is invisible to the naked eye.

These patterns are both the sole subject of some series and in others are used to build up larger compositions that relate to them conceptually.

ABOUT THIS ARTIST: Multimedia artist Kysa Johnson received her BFA from the Glasgow School of Art in Glasgow, Scotland. Her work explores the mathematical theories behind black holes and organic decay. The final image appears to be an abstract, but a closer look reveals the equations and patterns repeated again and again to create the final image. She is represented by Morgan Lehman Gallery in New York.

PACKAGING: 30x40" and 40x60" prints are shipped in a special fortified tube to guard against bending or damage. Framed 30x40" prints are shipped via FedEx in a bespoke cardboard box with a fitted interior armature for the frame. We do not frame the extra large, 40x60" print sizes because they are too large to ship without risking damage.

INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING: We ship unframed prints internationally via DHL. The international shipping cost does not include the tax & duties, which will be the responsibility of the customer. Unfortunately, because of the high shipping cost we do not ship framed prints internationally at this time.

Publisher: ArtStar

About Kysa Johnson

In her own words, the work of multimedia artist Kysa Johnson “explores patterns in nature that exist at the extremes of scale,” or realities “invisible to the naked eye.” Johnson’s compositions are based on visualizations of the macro- and microscopic, though their sources are not immediately apparent. What look like lush still lifes and landscapes might actually be depictions of diseases and their cures, maps of the universe, or molecular structures. In one of her wittiest series, Johnson recreates historic and iconic paintings of the Virgin Mary using drawings of budding yeast, in an ongoing series she refers to as “Immaculate Conception / Asexual Reproduction”. Johnson has also created a number of site-specific installations depicting landscapes; in each case, the work’s composition is based on imagery from the area in which the site is located.

American, b. 1974, Evanston, Illinois, based in Brooklyn, New York