Skip to Main Content
Laura Lima, ‘Man=flesh/Woman=felsh - FLAT’, 1997, Fondation Beyeler
Save
Save
Share
Share

Laura Lima

Man=flesh/Woman=felsh - FLAT, 1997

Location
Riehen
About the work
Exhibition history
Medium
Performance Art
Image rights
Courtesy of RUHRTRIENNALE 2012-14
Laura Lima
Brazilian, b. 1971
Follow

Laura Lima is best known for creating performative situations that subject the body to physical stress in order to investigate human behaviors. In Homem=carne/mulher=carne – Pelos + Rede, first conceived in 1996 and recreated since, a man and woman lie reclined and nude in a large hammock. With their relationship defined only by physical proximity, the work delves into questions of human relations but remains ambiguous. Treating the social body as a form of sculpture, Lima works in the tradition of earlier Neo-Concrete Brazilian artists such as Lygia Clark and Hélio Oiticica, whose objects often serve as entry points for participatory or interactive art.

Laura Lima, ‘Man=flesh/Woman=felsh - FLAT’, 1997, Fondation Beyeler
Save
Save
Share
Share
About the work
Exhibition history
Medium
Performance Art
Image rights
Courtesy of RUHRTRIENNALE 2012-14
Laura Lima
Brazilian, b. 1971
Follow

Laura Lima is best known for creating performative situations that subject the body to physical stress in order to investigate human behaviors. In Homem=carne/mulher=carne – Pelos + Rede, first conceived in 1996 and recreated since, a man and woman lie reclined and nude in a large hammock. With their relationship defined only by physical proximity, the work delves into questions of human relations but remains ambiguous. Treating the social body as a form of sculpture, Lima works in the tradition of earlier Neo-Concrete Brazilian artists such as Lygia Clark and Hélio Oiticica, whose objects often serve as entry points for participatory or interactive art.

Laura Lima

Man=flesh/Woman=felsh - FLAT, 1997

Location
Riehen
Other works by Laura Lima
Other works from Fondation Beyeler
Related works
Most Similar
Identity Politics
Contemporary Participation