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In How We See, Laurie Simmons draws on the “Doll Girls” subculture of people who alter themselves with makeup, dress, and even cosmetic surgery to look like Barbie, baby dolls, and anime characters. Evoking the tradition of the high-school portrait — when teenagers present their idealized selves to the camera — …

Medium
Series
How We See
Image rights
Courtesy of Salon 94 and Laurie Simmons

Laurie Simmons’ engagement with non-human subjects ranges from her earlier works, in which she photographed miniature scenes of post-war domestic splendor, to her more recent use of life-size sex dolls that appear to be engaged in surprisingly believable activities. Endowing dolls, puppets, and ventriloquist dummies with a very human sense of longing and loneliness, Simmons creates psychologically astute critiques of women’s roles in their myriad incarnations from housewife to sex object. For the series “The Love Doll: Days 1-30” (2009-2011), Simmons transformed her home into a dollhouse and shot a series of photographs documenting the process of becoming acquainted with her custom-made Japanese “love doll”, with the doll appearing to feel increasingly at ease in her surroundings as the days passed.

High auction record
$100.0k, Christie's, 2016
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2019
Laurie Simmons: Big Camera/Little CameraMCA Chicago
2014
Disturbing InnocenceThe FLAG Art Foundation
Kigurumi, Dollers and How We SeeSalon 94
View all

How We See/Ajak (Violet), 2015

Pigment print
70 × 48 in
177.8 × 121.9 cm
.
Location
New York
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In How We See, Laurie Simmons draws on the “Doll Girls” subculture of people who alter themselves …

Medium
Series
How We See
Image rights
Courtesy of Salon 94 and Laurie Simmons

Laurie Simmons’ engagement with non-human subjects ranges from her earlier works, in which she photographed miniature scenes of post-war domestic splendor, to her more recent use of life-size sex dolls that appear to be engaged in surprisingly believable activities. Endowing dolls, puppets, and ventriloquist dummies with a very human sense of longing and loneliness, Simmons creates psychologically astute critiques of women’s roles in their myriad incarnations from housewife to sex object. For the series “The Love Doll: Days 1-30” (2009-2011), Simmons transformed her home into a dollhouse and shot a series of photographs documenting the process of becoming acquainted with her custom-made Japanese “love doll”, with the doll appearing to feel increasingly at ease in her surroundings as the days passed.

High auction record
$100.0k, Christie's, 2016
Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by major museums
Tate, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works by Laurie Simmons
Other works from Rubber Factory
Related works
Related artists