Lina Bo Bardi, ‘"Tridente" armchair, ’, ca. 1949, Pé Palito
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Lina Bo Bardi

"Tridente" armchair, , ca. 1949

Wooden structure, upholstery
Unique
About the work
Pé Palito

Studio Palma

Medium
Design/Decorative Art
Image rights
Pé Palito (disclosure)
Lina Bo Bardi
Brazilian-Italian, 1914–1992
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Devoting her life to the promotion of the social and cultural potential of architecture and design, Brazilian architect and designer Lina Bo Bardi produced varied work: from architectural projects and publications to modern furniture reflective of this ethos. Her furniture was most often made from native Brazilian woods, which she admired for their strength and beauty. Bo Bardi’s most iconic design is her upholstered Bowl chair on a metal frame (1951). This chair, like other products she designed, inherited its own natural logic through modular design and was overall reflective of the artist’s adaptive style. Envisioned as an affordable and flexible object able to integrate seamlessly into any surrounding environment, the chair—a combination of bowl and base—could be positioned according to intended performance and function. Effortlessly combining industrialized production with good design, Bo Bardi’s chair, like her overall practice, was playful and accessible yet deeply rooted in the history of modernism and design.

Lina Bo Bardi, ‘"Tridente" armchair, ’, ca. 1949, Pé Palito
Save
Save
Share
Share
About the work
Pé Palito

Studio Palma

Medium
Design/Decorative Art
Image rights
Pé Palito (disclosure)
Lina Bo Bardi
Brazilian-Italian, 1914–1992
Follow

Devoting her life to the promotion of the social and cultural potential of architecture and design, Brazilian architect and designer Lina Bo Bardi produced varied work: from architectural projects and publications to modern furniture reflective of this ethos. Her furniture was most often made from native Brazilian woods, which she admired for their strength and beauty. Bo Bardi’s most iconic design is her upholstered Bowl chair on a metal frame (1951). This chair, like other products she designed, inherited its own natural logic through modular design and was overall reflective of the artist’s adaptive style. Envisioned as an affordable and flexible object able to integrate seamlessly into any surrounding environment, the chair—a combination of bowl and base—could be positioned according to intended performance and function. Effortlessly combining industrialized production with good design, Bo Bardi’s chair, like her overall practice, was playful and accessible yet deeply rooted in the history of modernism and design.

Lina Bo Bardi

"Tridente" armchair, , ca. 1949

Wooden structure, upholstery
Unique
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