Lionel Gilbert, ‘Blue on the Side’, 1965, Carrie Haddad Gallery
Lionel Gilbert, ‘Blue on the Side’, 1965, Carrie Haddad Gallery
Lionel Gilbert, ‘Blue on the Side’, 1965, Carrie Haddad Gallery
Lionel Gilbert, ‘Blue on the Side’, 1965, Carrie Haddad Gallery

Larson Juhl black wood recessed frame.
Mid-century modern, abstracted still life of fruit on a table with a cubist perspective. Iconic cubist imagery is depicted through geometric forms that are met with loose, painterly brushstrokes. Elements of lime green and vivid blue contrast with deep black and white background and subdued beige and grey details.
Lionel Gilbert moved back and forth between abstraction and figuration, at once describing specific objects and presenting flat, unrecognizable forms. The artist, born in 1912, was a prolific painter from the nineteen-thirties until his recent death. For years, Gilbert worked as a mural artist and an illustrator, creating images that not only represented reality, but documented history. In the sixties, Gilbert’s direction shifted: no longer using the paint to tell stories, Gilbert began to explore what the paint itself—its materiality, color—can reveal, independent of its descriptive capacity. The works here on display call to mind Matisse, Braque, and Leger in their cubist sensibility and handling of space.

About Lionel Gilbert

American, 1912-2002, Newark, NJ, based in New York, NY, United States