Lorser Feitelson, ‘Post Surreal Configuration: Eternal Recurrence’, 1939-1940, Louis Stern Fine Arts
 San Francisco, California, San Francisco Museum of Art, Lorser Feitelson and Helen Lundeberg: A Retrospective Exhibition, October 2 – November 16, 1980, catalogue number 24, page 44, illustrated. Also shown at the Frederick S. Wight Gallery, University of California, Los Angeles, March 17 – May 3, 1981;
Los Angeles, California, Jack Rutberg Fine Arts, On the Edge of America: California Modernist Art, November 8, 1996 – March 1, 1997;
Los Angeles, California, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Exposition Park, Paintings by Lorser Feitelson, January – February 1944;
San Francisco, California, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Paintings by Lorser Feitelson, April 18, 1944 – May 7, 1944;
Pasadena, California, Pasadena Museum of California Art, Post Surrealism, June 1 – September 1, 2002. Illustrated in catalogue p 38. Also shown at Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, Utah State University, October 11, 2002 – January 24, 2003.

San Francisco Museum of Art, Lorser Feitelson and Helen Lundeberg: A Retrospective Exhibition, California, 1980. Introduction by Henry T. Hopkins with catalogue text by Diane Degasis Moran.

Pasadena Museum of California Art, Post Surrealism, (catalogue), 2002, illustrated in color p. 38.

Collection of the artist;
Helen Lundeberg Feitelson;
Feitelson Arts Foundation.

About Lorser Feitelson

Lorser Feitelson was born on the East Coast and studied in New York and Paris before moving to Southern California, where he rose to prominence in the 1950s as one of the founders of Hard Edge Painting. Feitelson was profoundly influenced by the work of Henri Matisse, Marcel Duchamp, and the Italian Futurists, and he began his career producing formally experimental figurative drawings and paintings. By the 1940s he was painting geometric abstractions that he called “magical space forms”—restrained counterpoints to the Abstract Expressionism of the New York School. He continued to hone and reduce his style so that he was eventually producing single lines of paint in open fields of canvas, such as Untitled (February) (1970).

American, 1898-1978, Savannah, Georgia, based in New York & Los Angeles