Lucy Winton, ‘Exquisite Corpse 32’, ca. 2011, Mana Contemporary

THE ARMITAGE GONE DANCE EXQUISITE CORPSE PROJECT

More than 180 internationally recognized visual artists, architects, designers and photographers participated in the Armitage Gone! Dance Exquisite Corpse Project, beginning in 2011. The artists created one hundred and thirty nine artworks to benefit Armitage Gone! Dance, an internationally acclaimed contemporary dance company under the direction of renowned choreographer Karole Armitage. Using the 1920's surrealist parlor game "cadavre exquise," a drawing that combines words and/or images by multiple artists on one sheet of paper, the project celebrates the theme of chance encounters, surprise and radical juxtaposition. Each artist adds to the composition, in sequence, without seeing the contribution of the previous person. The chance juxtaposition of images and styles results in a work that is both unexpected and amusing. Each drawing is a combination of the work of three or four artists.

The Exquisite Corpse project is a way for a wide range of artists to express their support for Armitage’s work and also a way for her to acknowledge artists who have played such a large role in her career. The project also highlights the “performative” aspect of art-making by demonstrating that drawing, performance art, and dance all have in common spontaneity and an unpredictable nature. The evanescent quality of dance is mirrored in the surprising juxtapositions of the Exquisite Corpse.

About Douglas Gordon

From Hollywood films to scientific footage to classical literature, Douglas Gordon takes the seemingly familiar and twists it. Having begun his career as a performance artist, Gordon has produced a diverse body of works, which has grown to include video, sound photographic objects, and texts, often plays with viewers’ perceptions, memories and expectations. In his well known work 24 Hour Psycho (1993), he slows down Alfred Hitchcock's legendary 1960 film Psycho into a full day's duration, drawing out the horror until it has ceased to be suspenseful. As Gordon himself has said, “I am the one who provides the board, the pieces and the dice, but you are the one who has to play.” Gordon won a Hugo Boss Prize in 1998.

Scottish, b. 1966, Glasgow, United Kingdom, based in Berlin, Germany

About Eric Fischl

Neo-expressionist painter Eric Fischl achieved recognition in the 1980s for his figurative paintings exploring suburban adolescent sexuality, as in Sleepwalker (1979), which depicts a boy hunched over in a plastic pool, masturbating. His work commonly exposes the dark, disturbing undercurrents of American life; his unconventional 9/11 memorial sculpture, Tumbling Woman (2001), was removed from public view amid controversy. Fischl is also the founder of the “America: Now and Here” project, a mobile museum and performance space that will tour the U.S. for two years.

American, b. 1948, New York, New York, based in Sag Harbor, New York