Marc Chagall, ‘Adam Et Eve Et Le Fruit Defendu (From Dessins Pour La Bible)’, 1960, Waddington's
Marc Chagall, ‘Adam Et Eve Et Le Fruit Defendu (From Dessins Pour La Bible)’, 1960, Waddington's
Marc Chagall, ‘Adam Et Eve Et Le Fruit Defendu (From Dessins Pour La Bible)’, 1960, Waddington's

Printed by Mourlot, Paris
Published by Verve, Paris

From the Catalogue:
The father of Surrealism, Chagall’s Adam et Eve et le Fruit Defendu, 1960 is the archetype of the artist’s style – the dream-like state he created throughout his oeuvre. Over his career, Chagall was captivated by the Bible: “It always seemed to me the greatest source of poetry of all time” stated the artist, “there is nothing more powerful than the first man and woman”. This figurative nature of Adam and Eve, side by side, their elongated bodies appear weightless, floating – both seemly content as Adam holds the forbidden fruit. Surrounded by the lushness of the Garden of Eden, the foliage and menagerie of animals co-exiting in the last few seconds of this true paradise, is perfectly captured by Chagall.
Courtesy of Waddington's

Signature: signed and numbered 32/50 in pencil to margin

MOURLOT, 235

Galerie Dresdnere Inc., Toronto label verso, inventory No. 6072, accompanied by the receipt dated April 1, 1964, invoice No. M103
From whom purchased by a Private Collection, Westmount, Quebec.

About Marc Chagall

Honored for his distinct style and pioneering role among Jewish artists, Marc Chagall painted dream-like subjects rooted in personal history and Eastern European folklore. He worked in several mediums, including painting, printmaking, and book illustration, and his stained glass windows can be seen in New York, France, and Jerusalem. Chagall arrived in Paris in 1910 and began experimenting with Cubism, befriending painters Robert Delaunay and Fernand Léger. Chagall’s style has been described as a hybrid of Cubism, Fauvism, and Symbolism, and his supernatural subjects are thought to have significantly influenced the Surrealists. Though he actively engaged in the Parisian artistic community, art for Chagall was first and foremost a means of personal expression. He preferred to be considered separately from other artists, his imagery and allegory uniquely his own.

Russian-French, 1887-1985, Vitebsk, Belarus