Marc Chagall, ‘Derrière le Miroir No. 27-28 (front cover) (The Village by Night)’, 1950, Graves International Art
Marc Chagall, ‘Derrière le Miroir No. 27-28 (front cover) (The Village by Night)’, 1950, Graves International Art
Marc Chagall, ‘Derrière le Miroir No. 27-28 (front cover) (The Village by Night)’, 1950, Graves International Art
Marc Chagall, ‘Derrière le Miroir No. 27-28 (front cover) (The Village by Night)’, 1950, Graves International Art
Marc Chagall, ‘Derrière le Miroir No. 27-28 (front cover) (The Village by Night)’, 1950, Graves International Art
Marc Chagall, ‘Derrière le Miroir No. 27-28 (front cover) (The Village by Night)’, 1950, Graves International Art
Marc Chagall, ‘Derrière le Miroir No. 27-28 (front cover) (The Village by Night)’, 1950, Graves International Art
Marc Chagall, ‘Derrière le Miroir No. 27-28 (front cover) (The Village by Night)’, 1950, Graves International Art
Marc Chagall, ‘Derrière le Miroir No. 27-28 (front cover) (The Village by Night)’, 1950, Graves International Art
Marc Chagall, ‘Derrière le Miroir No. 27-28 (front cover) (The Village by Night)’, 1950, Graves International Art

An original one page lithograph on white wove paper by Russian-French artist Marc Chagall (1887-1985) titled "The Village by Night"(front cover), 1950. It is estimated the limited edition was roughly 1,000. Edition issued by Galerie Maeght for "Derrière le Miroir No. 27-28". These were not signed. Published by: Maeght, Paris. Lithographs printed by: Mourlot, Paris. Included in the purchase of this listing is a second double page sheet showing 4 total sides of information about Chagall and the issue itself. (Please see pictures.) Sheet size: 15" x 11". Image size: 10.5" x 8". Being a front cover page, there is light wear associated with age and handling. Very good condition.

In October 1945, the French art dealer Aimé Maeght opens his art gallery at 13 Rue de Téhéran in Paris. His beginning coincides with the end of Second World War and the return of a number of exiled artists back to France. The magazine Derriere Le Miroir was created in October 1946 and published without interruption until 1982. Maeght's ambition in establishing his print shop and his publication magazine Derriere Le Miroir was to make available to a broader audience less expensive printed imagery by the artists of his time, many whom were represented by his Paris gallery. Its original articles and illustrations (mainly original color lithographs by the gallery artists) were famous at the time.

The magazine covered only the artists exhibited by Maeght gallery either through personal or group exhibitions. Among them are (in alphabetical order): Henri-Georges Adam, Pierre Alechinsky, Bacon, Jean Bazaine, Georges Braque, Pol Bury, Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Roger Chastel, Eduardo Chillida, Alberto Giacometti, Vassily Kandinsky, Ellsworth Kelly, Fernand Léger, Lindner, Henri Matisse, Joan Miró, Jacques Monory, Pablo Palazuelo, Paul Rebeyrolle, Jean-Paul Riopelle, Saul Steinberg, Pierre Tal-Coat, Antoni Tapies, Raoul Ubac, Bram van Velde.

Series: Derrière le Miroir No. 27-28, 1950

Image rights: Copyright © Graves International Art

Publisher: Maeght Editeur

About Marc Chagall

Honored for his distinct style and pioneering role among Jewish artists, Marc Chagall painted dream-like subjects rooted in personal history and Eastern European folklore. He worked in several mediums, including painting, printmaking, and book illustration, and his stained glass windows can be seen in New York, France, and Jerusalem. Chagall arrived in Paris in 1910 and began experimenting with Cubism, befriending painters Robert Delaunay and Fernand Léger. Chagall’s style has been described as a hybrid of Cubism, Fauvism, and Symbolism, and his supernatural subjects are thought to have significantly influenced the Surrealists. Though he actively engaged in the Parisian artistic community, art for Chagall was first and foremost a means of personal expression. He preferred to be considered separately from other artists, his imagery and allegory uniquely his own.

Russian-French, 1887-1985, Vitebsk, Belarus