Marc Chagall, ‘The Circus With The Yellow Clown’, 1967, ArtWise

First edition lithograph Poster created for an exhibition of lithographs and engravings at the Berggruen Gallery in Paris. Published by Berggruen, Paris. Number 50 in ëChagall's Posters - A Cataloque Raisonne', Sorlier, 1975. Mounted on linen. Chagall's early life left him with a "powerful visual memory and a pictorial intelligence". After living in France and experiencing the atmosphere of artistic freedom, his "vision soared and he created a new reality, one that drew on both his inner and outer worlds." But it was the images and memories of his early years in Belarus that would sustain his art for more than 70 years. Of circus people he said, "Why am I so touched by their make-up and grimaces? With them I can move forward toward new horizons. Chaplin seeks to do in film what I am trying to do in my paintings. He is perhaps the only artist today I could get along with without having to say a single word."

About Marc Chagall

Honored for his distinct style and pioneering role among Jewish artists, Marc Chagall painted dream-like subjects rooted in personal history and Eastern European folklore. He worked in several mediums, including painting, printmaking, and book illustration, and his stained glass windows can be seen in New York, France, and Jerusalem. Chagall arrived in Paris in 1910 and began experimenting with Cubism, befriending painters Robert Delaunay and Fernand Léger. Chagall’s style has been described as a hybrid of Cubism, Fauvism, and Symbolism, and his supernatural subjects are thought to have significantly influenced the Surrealists. Though he actively engaged in the Parisian artistic community, art for Chagall was first and foremost a means of personal expression. He preferred to be considered separately from other artists, his imagery and allegory uniquely his own.

Russian-French, 1887-1985, Vitebsk, Belarus