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"50th Anniversary of the Famous International Armory Show 1913", Exhibition Poster Designed by Marcel Duchamp, 1963

Lithograph on paper
44 3/10 × 26 1/2 in
112.5 × 67.25 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
$2,500
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Shipping: $33 domestic, $88 rest of world
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Locked
Secure payment
Secure transactions by credit card through Stripe.
Learn more.
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Follow

"50th Anniversary of the Famous International Armory Show 1913", 1963, Exhibition Poster, …

Read more

"50th Anniversary of the Famous International Armory Show 1913", 1963, Exhibition Poster, lithograph on paper, edition size unknown,
44-1/4 x 26-1/2 in. (112.5 x 67.25 cm).
Condition:
Excellent- time-staining in upper image and text; expertly-repaired tear at top edge,
slightly into image; minor restoration at …

Read more
Condition
Excellent- time-staining in upper image and text; expertly-repaired tear at top edge, slightly into image; minor restoration at edges.
Signature
Not signed, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, New York
Marcel Duchamp
French, 1887–1968
Follow

Associated with the Dada, Surrealist, Cubist, and Futurist movements, Marcel Duchamp radically subverted conventional practices of artmaking and display, challenging such weighty notions as the hand of the artist and the sanctity of the art object. Duchamp’s depiction of dynamic Cubist forms in Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) established him as a leading member of the international avant-garde. In 1913 Duchamp created Bicycle Wheel, which is considered the first of his famous readymades—minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist. Particularly in his readymades, Duchamp placed unprecedented emphasis on the artistic concept as paramount over craftsmanship or aesthetics, a guiding principle that has proved hugely influential to 20th-century artistic practice.

Pablo Picasso
Spanish, 1881–1973
Follow

A prolific and tireless innovator of art forms, Pablo Picasso impacted the course of 20th-century art with unparalleled magnitude. Inspired by African and Iberian art and developments in the world around him, Picasso contributed significantly to a number of artistic movements, notably Cubism, Surrealism, Neoclassicism, and Expressionism. Along with Georges Braque, Picasso is best known for pioneering Cubism in an attempt to reconcile three-dimensional space with the two-dimensional picture plane, once asking, “Are we to paint what’s on the face, what’s inside the face, or what’s behind it?” Responding to the Spanish Civil War, he painted his most famous work, Guernica (1937), whose violent images of anguished figures rendered in grisaille made it a definitive work of anti-war art. “Painting is not made to decorate apartments,” he said. “It’s an offensive and defensive weapon against the enemy.” Picasso’s sizable oeuvre includes over 20,000 paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, theater sets, and costume designs.

Wassily Kandinsky
Russian, 1866–1944
Follow

An early champion of abstract painting, Wassily Kandinsky is known for his lyrical style and innovative theories on nonfigurative art. In his 1910 treatise Concerning the Spiritual In Art, Kandinsky made famous his belief that abstract colors and forms can be used to express the “inner life” of the artist. Kandinsky taught this and other lessons at the Bauhaus, the historic Weimar institution that brought together artists including Joseph Albers, Lazlo Maholy-Nagy, and Piet Mondrian, amongst others. Kandinsky had a strong interest in the relationship between art and classical music, this theme apparent in his orchestral Composition VI (1913), where colliding forms and colors move across the canvas. In 1911 Kandinsky played a central role in organizing Der Blaue Reiter, a group of artists named in part after Kandinsky’s favorite color, blue.

Henri Matisse
French, 1869–1954
Follow

Henri Matisse was a leading figure of Fauvism and, along with Pablo Picasso, one of the most influential artists of the modern era. In his paintings, sculptures, and works on paper, Matisse experimented with vivid colors, Pointillist techniques, and reduced, flat shapes. “What I dream of is an art of balance, of purity and serenity, devoid of troubling or depressing subject matter,” he once said; his subjects of choice included nudes, dancers, still lifes, and interior scenes. Matisse’s animated brushwork and seemingly arbitrary application of bright colors, as in Woman with a Hat (1905), would prove foundational to Fauvism, while his similarly radical The Red Studio (1911) was a seminal, nearly monochromatic study in perspective. Later in life, physically debilitated, Matisse would turn to making bold, cut-paper collages. He has influenced a wide range of important 20th-century painters, from Hans Hofmann and Milton Avery to Tom Wesselmann and David Hockney.

Constantin Brâncuși
Romanian-French, 1876–1957
Follow

Seminal modern sculptor Constantin Brancusi created metal castings and carvings in stone and wood that, unadorned and reduced in form, fulfilled his famous principle: “What is real is not the appearance, but the idea, the essence of things.” After moving to Paris from his native Romania, Brancusi was invited to study in Auguste Rodin’s workshop, but left after two months with the explanation that, “Nothing can grow under big trees.” Brancusi’s signature style is graceful in its simplicity, as with his iconic The Kiss (1907-1910) and Bird (1940); he would return to these and other motifs throughout his career, centered on primordial, biomorphic forms. Brancusi was influenced by art and folklore of Cycladic, African, and Romanian cultures, and he inspired numerous sculptors to focus on fundamental concerns of form and space, including Richard Serra and Isamu Noguchi, the latter serving as his studio assistant in 1927.

Paul Cézanne
French, 1839–1906
Follow

Paul Cézanne is one of the great Post-Impressionist painters of the 19th century, renowned for his radiant landscapes, intense portraits, and complex still lifes. His influence extends to every aspect of Post-Impressionist inquiry, from the search for empirical truth in painting, which he saw as including imbalance and lacunae, to the capturing of the instantaneity of vision, and the calling of attention to the dimensionality of the canvas space. His paintings of apples, card players, and the landscape of Mount Sainte Victoire, which he saw from his window in Provence, France, are some of the best-known images in Western art. His mature works are striking for their vivid palette, sensitive brushstrokes, and swirling, unstable compositions full of impetuosity and vigor that paved the way for the advent of Cubism and abstract painting.

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Save
view
View in room
share
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Follow

"50th Anniversary of the Famous International Armory Show 1913", 1963, Exhibition Poster, …

Read more

"50th Anniversary of the Famous International Armory Show 1913", 1963, Exhibition Poster, lithograph on paper, edition size unknown,
44-1/4 x 26-1/2 in. (112.5 x 67.25 cm).
Condition:
Excellent- time-staining in upper image and text; expertly-repaired tear at top edge,
slightly into image; minor restoration at …

Read more
Condition
Excellent- time-staining in upper image and text; expertly-repaired tear at top edge, slightly into image; minor restoration at edges.
Signature
Not signed, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, New York
Marcel Duchamp
French, 1887–1968
Follow

Associated with the Dada, Surrealist, Cubist, and Futurist movements, Marcel Duchamp radically subverted conventional practices of artmaking and display, challenging such weighty notions as the hand of the artist and the sanctity of the art object. Duchamp’s depiction of dynamic Cubist forms in Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) established him as a leading member of the international avant-garde. In 1913 Duchamp created Bicycle Wheel, which is considered the first of his famous readymades—minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist. Particularly in his readymades, Duchamp placed unprecedented emphasis on the artistic concept as paramount over craftsmanship or aesthetics, a guiding principle that has proved hugely influential to 20th-century artistic practice.

Pablo Picasso
Spanish, 1881–1973
Follow

A prolific and tireless innovator of art forms, Pablo Picasso impacted the course of 20th-century art with unparalleled magnitude. Inspired by African and Iberian art and developments in the world around him, Picasso contributed significantly to a number of artistic movements, notably Cubism, Surrealism, Neoclassicism, and Expressionism. Along with Georges Braque, Picasso is best known for pioneering Cubism in an attempt to reconcile three-dimensional space with the two-dimensional picture plane, once asking, “Are we to paint what’s on the face, what’s inside the face, or what’s behind it?” Responding to the Spanish Civil War, he painted his most famous work, Guernica (1937), whose violent images of anguished figures rendered in grisaille made it a definitive work of anti-war art. “Painting is not made to decorate apartments,” he said. “It’s an offensive and defensive weapon against the enemy.” Picasso’s sizable oeuvre includes over 20,000 paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures, ceramics, theater sets, and costume designs.

Wassily Kandinsky
Russian, 1866–1944
Follow

An early champion of abstract painting, Wassily Kandinsky is known for his lyrical style and innovative theories on nonfigurative art. In his 1910 treatise Concerning the Spiritual In Art, Kandinsky made famous his belief that abstract colors and forms can be used to express the “inner life” of the artist. Kandinsky taught this and other lessons at the Bauhaus, the historic Weimar institution that brought together artists including Joseph Albers, Lazlo Maholy-Nagy, and Piet Mondrian, amongst others. Kandinsky had a strong interest in the relationship between art and classical music, this theme apparent in his orchestral Composition VI (1913), where colliding forms and colors move across the canvas. In 1911 Kandinsky played a central role in organizing Der Blaue Reiter, a group of artists named in part after Kandinsky’s favorite color, blue.

Henri Matisse
French, 1869–1954
Follow

Henri Matisse was a leading figure of Fauvism and, along with Pablo Picasso, one of the most influential artists of the modern era. In his paintings, sculptures, and works on paper, Matisse experimented with vivid colors, Pointillist techniques, and reduced, flat shapes. “What I dream of is an art of balance, of purity and serenity, devoid of troubling or depressing subject matter,” he once said; his subjects of choice included nudes, dancers, still lifes, and interior scenes. Matisse’s animated brushwork and seemingly arbitrary application of bright colors, as in Woman with a Hat (1905), would prove foundational to Fauvism, while his similarly radical The Red Studio (1911) was a seminal, nearly monochromatic study in perspective. Later in life, physically debilitated, Matisse would turn to making bold, cut-paper collages. He has influenced a wide range of important 20th-century painters, from Hans Hofmann and Milton Avery to Tom Wesselmann and David Hockney.

Constantin Brâncuși
Romanian-French, 1876–1957
Follow

Seminal modern sculptor Constantin Brancusi created metal castings and carvings in stone and wood that, unadorned and reduced in form, fulfilled his famous principle: “What is real is not the appearance, but the idea, the essence of things.” After moving to Paris from his native Romania, Brancusi was invited to study in Auguste Rodin’s workshop, but left after two months with the explanation that, “Nothing can grow under big trees.” Brancusi’s signature style is graceful in its simplicity, as with his iconic The Kiss (1907-1910) and Bird (1940); he would return to these and other motifs throughout his career, centered on primordial, biomorphic forms. Brancusi was influenced by art and folklore of Cycladic, African, and Romanian cultures, and he inspired numerous sculptors to focus on fundamental concerns of form and space, including Richard Serra and Isamu Noguchi, the latter serving as his studio assistant in 1927.

Paul Cézanne
French, 1839–1906
Follow

Paul Cézanne is one of the great Post-Impressionist painters of the 19th century, renowned for his radiant landscapes, intense portraits, and complex still lifes. His influence extends to every aspect of Post-Impressionist inquiry, from the search for empirical truth in painting, which he saw as including imbalance and lacunae, to the capturing of the instantaneity of vision, and the calling of attention to the dimensionality of the canvas space. His paintings of apples, card players, and the landscape of Mount Sainte Victoire, which he saw from his window in Provence, France, are some of the best-known images in Western art. His mature works are striking for their vivid palette, sensitive brushstrokes, and swirling, unstable compositions full of impetuosity and vigor that paved the way for the advent of Cubism and abstract painting.

"50th Anniversary of the Famous International Armory Show 1913", Exhibition Poster Designed by Marcel Duchamp, 1963

Lithograph on paper
44 3/10 × 26 1/2 in
112.5 × 67.25 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
$2,500
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Shipping: $33 domestic, $88 rest of world
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Locked
Secure payment
Secure transactions by credit card through Stripe.
Learn more.
Have a question? Read our FAQ.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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Other works from VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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