Marcel Duchamp, ‘Marcel Duchamp and John Cage:  "Reunion"’, 1968-1970, Alpha 137 Gallery
Marcel Duchamp, ‘Marcel Duchamp and John Cage:  "Reunion"’, 1968-1970, Alpha 137 Gallery
Marcel Duchamp, ‘Marcel Duchamp and John Cage:  "Reunion"’, 1968-1970, Alpha 137 Gallery
Marcel Duchamp, ‘Marcel Duchamp and John Cage:  "Reunion"’, 1968-1970, Alpha 137 Gallery
Marcel Duchamp, ‘Marcel Duchamp and John Cage:  "Reunion"’, 1968-1970, Alpha 137 Gallery
Marcel Duchamp, ‘Marcel Duchamp and John Cage:  "Reunion"’, 1968-1970, Alpha 137 Gallery

Scarce album and recording of a famous chess match. hand-numbered from the edition of 500. This is a very elusive piece, as so many are in the permanent collections of major museums and foundations. The book itself is in very good condition, measuring 6.1 inches (vertical) by 8.5 inches (horizontal). The round recording is held in its original white sleeve measuring 5.75 square inches. This work documents the famous chess game entitled "Reunion" that took place at the Ryerson Theatre in Toronto on March 5th, 1968. Participants included Duchamp and Cage, along with Teeny Duchamp, David Tudor, Gordon Mumma, Lowell Cross, and David Behrman (who made the recording). Cross constructed a chess board with circuits which transmitted or cut off sound produced by a group of musicians activated by pieces moved across the board. A portion of the "concert" is contained on the phonodisc recorded by Behrman. See also Art in America 61: 72-9 (Nov. 1973).
In 1968, Cage used a chess game as the structure for Reunion, an event without a score, originally performed on an electrified chessboard created by Lowell Cross. The game works as a sublimely indeterminate structure: as a game of chess is played, the moves of the players activate four compositions and distribute them to eight speakers surrounding the audience. At the premiere of Reunion (Toronto, March 5, 1968), Cage played against Marcel and Teeny Duchamp, activating live compositions by Gordon Mumma, Lowell Cross, David Behrman, and David Tudor.
Below is a link to a few of the many scholarly articles about this historic event:
http://www.toutfait.com/issues/volume2/issue_4/music/chen/chen.htm
http://johncage.org/reunion/cross_reunion_revised.pdf
And for an actual snippet of what's on the recording, scroll to the bottom of this page from the John Cage Trust;
http://johncagetrust.blogspot.com/2013_07_01_archive.html
Text and photographs by Shigeko Kubota

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Signature: hand numbered from the limited edition of 500

Below is a link to a few of the many scholarly articles about this historic event:
http://www.toutfait.com/issues/volume2/issue_4/music/chen/chen.htm
http://johncage.org/reunion/cross_reunion_revised.pdf
And for an actual snippet of what's on the recording, scroll to the bottom of this page from the John Cage Trust;
http://johncagetrust.blogspot.com/2013_07_01_archive.html

About Marcel Duchamp

Associated with the Dada, Surrealist, Cubist, and Futurist movements, Marcel Duchamp radically subverted conventional practices of artmaking and display, challenging such weighty notions as the hand of the artist and the sanctity of the art object. Duchamp’s depiction of dynamic Cubist forms in Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) established him as a leading member of the international avant-garde. In 1913 Duchamp created Bicycle Wheel, which is considered the first of his famous readymades—minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist. Particularly in his readymades, Duchamp placed unprecedented emphasis on the artistic concept as paramount over craftsmanship or aesthetics, a guiding principle that has proved hugely influential to 20th-century artistic practice.

French, 1887-1968, Blainville-Crevon Seine-Maritime, France

About John Cage

One of the most influential composers of the 20th century and a leading figure in the post-war avant-garde, John Cage was a music theorist, writer, and artist, as well as a composer. His most famous piece, 4’33” (1952), consisted of musicians doing nothing but listening to the sounds in a room for the duration of 4 minutes and 33 seconds. For Cartridge Music (1960), he amplified small household objects in a live performance. Influenced by Indian philosophy, Zen Buddhism, and Duchamp’s readymades, Cage championed chance procedures in music, incorporating found sounds, noise, and alternative instruments into his compositions. Two important early collaborators were the painter Robert Rauschenberg and the dancer Merce Cunningham, who was also his romantic partner for most of their lives. Cage published his first book, Silence, in 1961 and, in the 1970s, began to transform literary works, including those of Joyce and Thoreau, into music.

American, 1912-1992, Los Angeles, California, based in New York, New York