Marcel Duchamp, ‘"PHARMACEUTICALS", 1968, Julian Levy Gallery NYC, Multiple from Art Journal S.M.S. (Shit Must Stop), RARE’, 1968, Print, Lithograph on paper, plastic, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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"PHARMACEUTICALS", 1968, Julian Levy Gallery NYC, Multiple from Art Journal S.M.S. (Shit Must Stop), RARE, 1968

Lithograph on paper, plastic
5 × 5 in
12.7 × 12.7 cm
.
$500
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Shipping: $33 domestic, $66 rest of world
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Locked
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VINCE fine arts/ephemera

"PHARMACEUTICALS", 1968, Julian Levy Gallery NYC, multiple from the legendary …

Medium
Condition
Mint
Signature
Not signed as issued., not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
The Letter Edged in Black Press, New York
Marcel Duchamp
French, 1887–1968
Follow

Associated with the Dada, Surrealist, Cubist, and Futurist movements, Marcel Duchamp radically subverted conventional practices of artmaking and display, challenging such weighty notions as the hand of the artist and the sanctity of the art object. Duchamp’s depiction of dynamic Cubist forms in Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) established him as a leading member of the international avant-garde. In 1913 Duchamp created Bicycle Wheel, which is considered the first of his famous readymades—minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist. Particularly in his readymades, Duchamp placed unprecedented emphasis on the artistic concept as paramount over craftsmanship or aesthetics, a guiding principle that has proved hugely influential to 20th-century artistic practice.

Salvador Dalí
Spanish, 1904–1989
Follow

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips.

Man Ray
American, 1890–1976
Follow

Born Emmanuel Radnitzky, Man Ray adopted his pseudonym in 1909 and would become one of the key figures of Dada and Surrealism. One of the few American artists associated with these movements, Ray was exposed to European avant-garde artists like Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque at Alfred Stieglitz’s New York gallery and at the 1913 Armory Show. Ray’s photographic works are considered his most profound achievement, particularly his portraits, fashion photographs, and technical experiments with the medium, such as solarization and rayographs (an eponym for his photograms), which were celebrated by the Surrealists. “I do not photograph nature,” he once said. “I photograph my visions.” In 1915 he was introduced to Marcel Duchamp, who would become a lifelong friend and influence; he subsequently moved to Paris, practicing there for over 20 years.

Hans Arp
German-French, 1886–1966
Follow

A pioneer of abstract art, Jean (aka Hans) Arp was instrumental in founding the Dada movement and participated actively in Surrealism and Constructivism. In his collages, reliefs, and sculptures, Arp often incorporated waste material such as discarded paper and fabric, and embraced chance and spontaneity as integral components of the artistic process. In Collage with Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance (1916), for example, Arp explored the potential for unique compositional relationships that result from inadvertent arrangement of collage elements. Arp’s articulation of biomorphic forms, inspired by organic material and the human figure, was simultaneously explored by Joan Miró and proved to be hugely influential to later 20th-century abstract artists.

William Nelson Copley
American, 1919–1996
Follow

Forging an unprecedented and unlikely link between the European Surrealist and American Pop Art movements, William N. Copley painted sweetly humorous, softly pornographic vignettes. His works are Surrealist in their unbridled expressions of sexual desire—he painted couples making love, men and women fantasizing about each other, figures in various states of undress and stages of foreplay. Through his use of bright colors, cartoonish figures, and wildly patterned backgrounds, Copley tempered his sometimes-X-rated imagery with a visual language similar to that of Pop Art. While his imagery is mined from a variety of sources, including racy magazines he would buy from the seedy shops that used to dominate New York’s Times Square, Copley’s work is whimsical, joyful, and lyrical. As he claims: “Humor, after all, is the reminder that we are mortal.” As his paintings suggest, so, apparently, is sex.

Walter De Maria
American, 1935–2013
Follow

California-born, New York-based Walter De Maria trained as a painter but soon turned to sculpture, creating early Minimalist works like sparely constructed wooden boxes while exploring media such as performance, film, and music (he was a proto-member of the Velvet Underground). He was also at the forefront of the 20th century's Land Art, Conceptual Art, and installation art movements, creating seminal works like The Lightning Field (1977), a series of 400 stainless steel poles arranged in a grid in the New Mexico desert; the viewers’ perception of the work changes with the time of day and atmospheric conditions.

Richard Hamilton
British, 1922–2011
Follow

In his celebrated collages, Richard Hamilton explored the relationship between fine art, product design, and popular culture, setting the stage for Pop art. His most iconic work, Just What Is it that Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956)—a scene comprised of images cut from magazines ads, showing a semi-nude couple in their living space—was produced for the groundbreaking exhibition “This is Tomorrow,” organized by the Independent Group at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London in 1956. Throughout his career, Hamilton continued to break down hierarchies of artistic value, making silkscreens of Mick Jagger’s drug arrest, producing studies of industrial design objects (like toasters), and designing the cover of the Beatles’ 1968 White Album.

René Magritte
Belgian, 1898–1967
Follow

With his highly cerebral Surrealist imagery, René Magritte breathed new life into seemingly conventional subject matter. He often painted everyday objects out of context, in juxtapositions forcing the viewer to reconsider things normally taken for granted. In his iconic trompe l’oeil work The Treachery of Images (1928-29), for example, Magritte painted a hyperrealistic pipe and wrote, just beneath it, “this is not a pipe”—a caution not to trust our eyes and reminder that the art object, no matter how convincing, is not the real thing. Magritte’s highly figurative style of Surrealism is often discussed along the work of Salvador Dalí and Giorgio de Chirico, and his persistent interrogation of objects has both influenced and paved the way for seminal artistic movements, from Conceptualism to Pop art.

Joan Miró
Spanish, 1893–1983
Follow

Joan Miró rejected the constraints of traditional painting, creating works “conceived with fire in the soul but executed with clinical coolness,” as he once said. Widely considered one of the leading Surrealists, though never officially part of the group, Miró pioneered a wandering linear style of Automatism—a method of “random” drawing that attempted to express the inner workings of the human psyche. Miró used color and form in a symbolic rather than literal manner, his intricate compositions combining abstract elements with recurring motifs like birds, eyes, and the moon. “I try to apply colors like words that shape poems, like notes that shape music,” he said. While he prized artistic freedom, Miró revered art history, basing a series of works on the Dutch Baroque interiors of Hendrick Sorgh and Jan Steen. In turn, Miró has inspired many artists—significantly Arshile Gorky, whose bold linear abstractions proved a foundational influence on Abstract Expressionism.

Max Ernst
German, 1891–1976
Follow

Closely associated with Dada and Surrealism, Max Ernst made paintings, sculptures, and prints depicting fantastic, nightmarish images that often made reference to anxieties originating in childhood. Ernst demonstrated a profound interest in Freudian psychoanalysis, which is apparent in his exploration of Automatism and his invention of the Frottage technique. The artist’s psychoanalytic leanings are evident in his iconic 1923 work Pietà, or Revolution by Night, in which Ernst substitutes the image of Mary cradling the body of Christ with a depiction of the artist himself held by his father. Much of the artist’s work defied societal norms, Christian morality, and the aesthetic standards of Western academic art.

Marcel Duchamp, ‘"PHARMACEUTICALS", 1968, Julian Levy Gallery NYC, Multiple from Art Journal S.M.S. (Shit Must Stop), RARE’, 1968, Print, Lithograph on paper, plastic, VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
V
VINCE fine arts/ephemera

"PHARMACEUTICALS", 1968, Julian Levy Gallery NYC, multiple from the legendary subscription based art journal S.M.S. (Shit Must Stop), Edition Size
apx. 2500, Publisher: The Letter Edged in Black Press New York.
The Julian Levy contribution comes from the #1 portfolio, and consists of a specially printed …

Medium
Condition
Mint
Signature
Not signed as issued., not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
The Letter Edged in Black Press, New York
Marcel Duchamp
French, 1887–1968
Follow

Associated with the Dada, Surrealist, Cubist, and Futurist movements, Marcel Duchamp radically subverted conventional practices of artmaking and display, challenging such weighty notions as the hand of the artist and the sanctity of the art object. Duchamp’s depiction of dynamic Cubist forms in Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 (1912) established him as a leading member of the international avant-garde. In 1913 Duchamp created Bicycle Wheel, which is considered the first of his famous readymades—minimally altered objects that are elevated to the status of art simply through the designation of the artist. Particularly in his readymades, Duchamp placed unprecedented emphasis on the artistic concept as paramount over craftsmanship or aesthetics, a guiding principle that has proved hugely influential to 20th-century artistic practice.

Salvador Dalí
Spanish, 1904–1989
Follow

Salvador Dalí was a leading proponent of Surrealism, the 20-century avant-garde movement that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious through strange, dream-like imagery. “Surrealism is destructive, but it destroys only what it considers to be shackles limiting our vision,” he said. Dalí is specially credited with the innovation of “paranoia-criticism,” a philosophy of art making he defined as “irrational understanding based on the interpretive-critical association of delirious phenomena.” In addition to meticulously painting fantastic compositions, such as The Accommodations of Desire (1929) and the melting clocks in his famed The Persistence of Memory (1931), Dalí was a prolific writer and early filmmaker, and cultivated an eccentric public persona with his flamboyant mustache, pet ocelot, and outlandish behavior and quips.

Man Ray
American, 1890–1976
Follow

Born Emmanuel Radnitzky, Man Ray adopted his pseudonym in 1909 and would become one of the key figures of Dada and Surrealism. One of the few American artists associated with these movements, Ray was exposed to European avant-garde artists like Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque at Alfred Stieglitz’s New York gallery and at the 1913 Armory Show. Ray’s photographic works are considered his most profound achievement, particularly his portraits, fashion photographs, and technical experiments with the medium, such as solarization and rayographs (an eponym for his photograms), which were celebrated by the Surrealists. “I do not photograph nature,” he once said. “I photograph my visions.” In 1915 he was introduced to Marcel Duchamp, who would become a lifelong friend and influence; he subsequently moved to Paris, practicing there for over 20 years.

Hans Arp
German-French, 1886–1966
Follow

A pioneer of abstract art, Jean (aka Hans) Arp was instrumental in founding the Dada movement and participated actively in Surrealism and Constructivism. In his collages, reliefs, and sculptures, Arp often incorporated waste material such as discarded paper and fabric, and embraced chance and spontaneity as integral components of the artistic process. In Collage with Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance (1916), for example, Arp explored the potential for unique compositional relationships that result from inadvertent arrangement of collage elements. Arp’s articulation of biomorphic forms, inspired by organic material and the human figure, was simultaneously explored by Joan Miró and proved to be hugely influential to later 20th-century abstract artists.

William Nelson Copley
American, 1919–1996
Follow

Forging an unprecedented and unlikely link between the European Surrealist and American Pop Art movements, William N. Copley painted sweetly humorous, softly pornographic vignettes. His works are Surrealist in their unbridled expressions of sexual desire—he painted couples making love, men and women fantasizing about each other, figures in various states of undress and stages of foreplay. Through his use of bright colors, cartoonish figures, and wildly patterned backgrounds, Copley tempered his sometimes-X-rated imagery with a visual language similar to that of Pop Art. While his imagery is mined from a variety of sources, including racy magazines he would buy from the seedy shops that used to dominate New York’s Times Square, Copley’s work is whimsical, joyful, and lyrical. As he claims: “Humor, after all, is the reminder that we are mortal.” As his paintings suggest, so, apparently, is sex.

Walter De Maria
American, 1935–2013
Follow

California-born, New York-based Walter De Maria trained as a painter but soon turned to sculpture, creating early Minimalist works like sparely constructed wooden boxes while exploring media such as performance, film, and music (he was a proto-member of the Velvet Underground). He was also at the forefront of the 20th century's Land Art, Conceptual Art, and installation art movements, creating seminal works like The Lightning Field (1977), a series of 400 stainless steel poles arranged in a grid in the New Mexico desert; the viewers’ perception of the work changes with the time of day and atmospheric conditions.

Richard Hamilton
British, 1922–2011
Follow

In his celebrated collages, Richard Hamilton explored the relationship between fine art, product design, and popular culture, setting the stage for Pop art. His most iconic work, Just What Is it that Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956)—a scene comprised of images cut from magazines ads, showing a semi-nude couple in their living space—was produced for the groundbreaking exhibition “This is Tomorrow,” organized by the Independent Group at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London in 1956. Throughout his career, Hamilton continued to break down hierarchies of artistic value, making silkscreens of Mick Jagger’s drug arrest, producing studies of industrial design objects (like toasters), and designing the cover of the Beatles’ 1968 White Album.

René Magritte
Belgian, 1898–1967
Follow

With his highly cerebral Surrealist imagery, René Magritte breathed new life into seemingly conventional subject matter. He often painted everyday objects out of context, in juxtapositions forcing the viewer to reconsider things normally taken for granted. In his iconic trompe l’oeil work The Treachery of Images (1928-29), for example, Magritte painted a hyperrealistic pipe and wrote, just beneath it, “this is not a pipe”—a caution not to trust our eyes and reminder that the art object, no matter how convincing, is not the real thing. Magritte’s highly figurative style of Surrealism is often discussed along the work of Salvador Dalí and Giorgio de Chirico, and his persistent interrogation of objects has both influenced and paved the way for seminal artistic movements, from Conceptualism to Pop art.

Joan Miró
Spanish, 1893–1983
Follow

Joan Miró rejected the constraints of traditional painting, creating works “conceived with fire in the soul but executed with clinical coolness,” as he once said. Widely considered one of the leading Surrealists, though never officially part of the group, Miró pioneered a wandering linear style of Automatism—a method of “random” drawing that attempted to express the inner workings of the human psyche. Miró used color and form in a symbolic rather than literal manner, his intricate compositions combining abstract elements with recurring motifs like birds, eyes, and the moon. “I try to apply colors like words that shape poems, like notes that shape music,” he said. While he prized artistic freedom, Miró revered art history, basing a series of works on the Dutch Baroque interiors of Hendrick Sorgh and Jan Steen. In turn, Miró has inspired many artists—significantly Arshile Gorky, whose bold linear abstractions proved a foundational influence on Abstract Expressionism.

Max Ernst
German, 1891–1976
Follow

Closely associated with Dada and Surrealism, Max Ernst made paintings, sculptures, and prints depicting fantastic, nightmarish images that often made reference to anxieties originating in childhood. Ernst demonstrated a profound interest in Freudian psychoanalysis, which is apparent in his exploration of Automatism and his invention of the Frottage technique. The artist’s psychoanalytic leanings are evident in his iconic 1923 work Pietà, or Revolution by Night, in which Ernst substitutes the image of Mary cradling the body of Christ with a depiction of the artist himself held by his father. Much of the artist’s work defied societal norms, Christian morality, and the aesthetic standards of Western academic art.

"PHARMACEUTICALS", 1968, Julian Levy Gallery NYC, Multiple from Art Journal S.M.S. (Shit Must Stop), RARE, 1968

Lithograph on paper, plastic
5 × 5 in
12.7 × 12.7 cm
.
$500
Ships from MIAMI, FL, US
Shipping: $33 domestic, $66 rest of world
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Locked
Secure payment
Secure transactions by credit card through Stripe.
Learn more.
Have a question? Visit our help center.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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