Marcel Dzama, ‘Her name was on our tongue’, 2008, ICI Annual Benefit & Auction 2015
Marcel Dzama, ‘Her name was on our tongue’, 2008, ICI Annual Benefit & Auction 2015
Marcel Dzama, ‘Her name was on our tongue’, 2008, ICI Annual Benefit & Auction 2015

Multidisciplinary artist Marcel Dzama is most well-known for his fantastical yet macabre drawings that feature various characters such as cowboys, ghosts, and dancers in muted colors. Whether depicted as individual portraits, as seen in Her name was on our tongue, or intertwined in large group settings, these reappearing figures define Dzama’s distinctive visual world. Dzama is represented in several major public collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Tate Gallery, London; and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York.

About Marcel Dzama

Often compared to outsider artist Henry Darger, Marcel Dzama’s small ink and watercolor drawings of hybrid characters, like humans with antlers or trees with hands, resemble story illustrations. Interspersed with a range of references including Surrealist film, Dadaism and Soviet-era agitprop, his work more often recalls folk and craft storytelling traditions, showing that simple narrative can be an intricate, compelling contemporary art-making strategy. Dzama also works in sculpture and video and has experimented with puppetry and costumes. His work has been used on the covers of a number of music albums for bands such as They Might Be Giants, Beck, and The Weakerthans; and his costume designs have been seen in music videos, including the video for the Bob Dylan’s When the Deal Goes Down.

Canadian, b. 1974, Winnipeg, Canada, based in Brooklyn, New York