Marcel Dzama, ‘The ball player’, 2016, David Zwirner

About Marcel Dzama

Often compared to outsider artist Henry Darger, Marcel Dzama’s small ink and watercolor drawings of hybrid characters, like humans with antlers or trees with hands, resemble story illustrations. Interspersed with a range of references including Surrealist film, Dadaism and Soviet-era agitprop, his work more often recalls folk and craft storytelling traditions, showing that simple narrative can be an intricate, compelling contemporary art-making strategy. Dzama also works in sculpture and video and has experimented with puppetry and costumes. His work has been used on the covers of a number of music albums for bands such as They Might Be Giants, Beck, and The Weakerthans; and his costume designs have been seen in music videos, including the video for the Bob Dylan’s When the Deal Goes Down.

Canadian, b. 1974, Winnipeg, Canada, based in Brooklyn, New York

About Raymond Pettibon

Having emerged from the Southern California DIY culture and its punk-rock sensibility, Raymond Pettibon fuses together youthful edginess and political engagement. Drawing from disparate cultural sources—from Marcel Proust to the Bible—the artist’s cartoon-inspired ink drawings on unframed paper recall the look of fanzines and concert flyers, however with an often cryptic semblance of narrative. More recently, Pettibon’s works have been a sustained critique of the Iraq War and American foreign policy, such as No Title ("Why press him?") (2007), which depicts George W. Bush with bloodied hands and surrounded by pointed, ironic commentary. Pettibon was a recipient of the Whitney's Bucksbaum award in 2004.

American, b. 1957, Tucson, Arizona, based in Hermosa Beach, California

Exhibition Highlights

2016
New York,
Shrines to Speed Art And The Automobile: From The Minimal To The Postmodern