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Medium
Signature
Hand-signed by artist
Certificate of authenticity
Included (issued by gallery)
Frame
Included

In her black-and-white prints and pencil drawings of scenes from popular films, Marie Harnett examines the potential of images to create an emotional response. Harnett predominantly uses recent films, such as American Hustle (2013) and Brideshead Revisited (2008), as her source imagery. She draws characters from the films in moments frozen in time, and forces their bodies and faces to become the source of drama and meaning by removing music, color, and dialogue—the conventional dramatic tools of cinema. Harnett maintains a bank of film trailers that she watches without audio and then selects stills to draw based on their potential to resonate outside the limited narrative of the movie. “I like all the images to connect together and balance,” she has said. “I always try to portray a few themes with my drawings, not a strict narrative but a sense of story and emotion.”

Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions
2021
Marie Harnett: What Was My OwnCristea Roberts Gallery
2017
Marie Harnett - 'Still'Cristea Roberts Gallery
2016
Alan Cristea Gallery Artists at the Royal Academy Summer ExhibitionCristea Roberts Gallery
View all

Perfect Happiness, 2020

Graphite on drafting film
7 9/10 × 5 1/2 in
20 × 14 cm
.
£4,500 - 5,500
Location
London
Certificate
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
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Medium
Signature
Hand-signed by artist
Certificate of authenticity
Included (issued by gallery)
Frame
Included

In her black-and-white prints and pencil drawings of scenes from popular films, Marie Harnett examines the potential of images to create an emotional response. Harnett predominantly uses recent films, such as American Hustle (2013) and Brideshead Revisited (2008), as her source imagery. She draws characters from the films in moments frozen in time, and forces their bodies and faces to become the source of drama and meaning by removing music, color, and dialogue—the conventional dramatic tools of cinema. Harnett maintains a bank of film trailers that she watches without audio and then selects stills to draw based on their potential to resonate outside the limited narrative of the movie. “I like all the images to connect together and balance,” she has said. “I always try to portray a few themes with my drawings, not a strict narrative but a sense of story and emotion.”

Established
Represented by industry leading galleries.
Collected by a major museum
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works from Marie Harnett: What Was My Own
Other works by Marie Harnett
Other works from Cristea Roberts Gallery
Related works
Related artists