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Typical of the sculptural output of dal Fabbro, the lines of this piece shift rhythmically depending on the viewer's position. The artist plays with the relationship between space and form, highlighting the way the piece's profile can change before the eye.

Medium
Condition
Consistent with age
Signature
Hand-signed by artist, Signed, dated, and inscribed C.4; bears an original title label
Frame
Not included

Mario Dal Fabbro was at various times during his career known as a furniture designer or sculptor. He was trained not only in decorative and industrial arts, but also in his family’s furniture design shop, where he worked from a young age. Between 1938 and 1948, Dal Fabbro contributed designs to furniture houses as well as individuals; shortly after, he moved to the United States and began designing furniture for mass production. In 1968, he turned his focus exclusively to sculpting wood, and was known for his deft handling of the material based on his skilled understanding of its grains, densities, and other natural properties. In addition to his various visual practices, Dal Fabbro published a number of books on design, and contributed to the New York Times, House and Garden, and Domus.

Exhibitions
2017
Maison Gerard at EXPO CHICAGO 2017Maison Gerard
2016
Maison Gerard at FOG Design+Art 2016Maison Gerard

Desert Vision, 1969

Carved wood
36 1/2 × 19 × 16 in
92.7 × 48.3 × 40.6 cm
.
$40,000 - 50,000
Location
New York, New York
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Typical of the sculptural output of dal Fabbro, the lines of this piece shift rhythmically …

Medium
Condition
Consistent with age
Signature
Hand-signed by artist, Signed, dated, and inscribed C.4; bears an original title label
Frame
Not included

Mario Dal Fabbro was at various times during his career known as a furniture designer or sculptor. He was trained not only in decorative and industrial arts, but also in his family’s furniture design shop, where he worked from a young age. Between 1938 and 1948, Dal Fabbro contributed designs to furniture houses as well as individuals; shortly after, he moved to the United States and began designing furniture for mass production. In 1968, he turned his focus exclusively to sculpting wood, and was known for his deft handling of the material based on his skilled understanding of its grains, densities, and other natural properties. In addition to his various visual practices, Dal Fabbro published a number of books on design, and contributed to the New York Times, House and Garden, and Domus.

Exhibitions (2)
Other works by Mario Dal Fabbro
Other works from Maison Gerard