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Mario Merz

Untitled (Igloo), 1989

Wax, rock, neon, glass, metal
167 3/10 × 334 3/5 in
425 × 850 cm
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
About the work
Medium
Installation
Image rights
Photo: Finnish National Gallery / Pirje Mykkänen
Mario Merz
Italian, 1925–2003
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A key member of the Arte Povera group, Mario Merz produced expansive mixed-media paintings, sculptures, and installations, through which he propagated an egalitarian, human-centered vision. Through art, he counteracted what he saw as the dehumanizing forces of industrialization and consumerism. Together with compatriots including Jannis Kounellis and Michelangelo Pistoletto, Merz eschewed fine art materials in favor of everyday and organic matter, like food, earth, found objects, and neon tubing. In 1968, he presented his first igloo, which became a motif in his work, representing the fundamental human need for shelter, nourishment, and connection to nature. By 1970, the Fibonacci sequence became central to his work, shaping the tables and spiraling forms for which he was known, and incorporated into his igloos and canvases. In these Merz sought limitlessness, against the confines of modern life.

Navigate left
Navigate right
Save
Save
Share
Share
Save
Save
Share
Share
About the work
Medium
Installation
Image rights
Photo: Finnish National Gallery / Pirje Mykkänen
Mario Merz
Italian, 1925–2003
Follow

A key member of the Arte Povera group, Mario Merz produced expansive mixed-media paintings, sculptures, and installations, through which he propagated an egalitarian, human-centered vision. Through art, he counteracted what he saw as the dehumanizing forces of industrialization and consumerism. Together with compatriots including Jannis Kounellis and Michelangelo Pistoletto, Merz eschewed fine art materials in favor of everyday and organic matter, like food, earth, found objects, and neon tubing. In 1968, he presented his first igloo, which became a motif in his work, representing the fundamental human need for shelter, nourishment, and connection to nature. By 1970, the Fibonacci sequence became central to his work, shaping the tables and spiraling forms for which he was known, and incorporated into his igloos and canvases. In these Merz sought limitlessness, against the confines of modern life.

Mario Merz

Untitled (Igloo), 1989

Wax, rock, neon, glass, metal
167 3/10 × 334 3/5 in
425 × 850 cm
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.