Mark King, ‘Amen Corner, Augusta National Golf Club’, 2012, Graves International Art
Mark King, ‘Amen Corner, Augusta National Golf Club’, 2012, Graves International Art
Mark King, ‘Amen Corner, Augusta National Golf Club’, 2012, Graves International Art
Mark King, ‘Amen Corner, Augusta National Golf Club’, 2012, Graves International Art
Mark King, ‘Amen Corner, Augusta National Golf Club’, 2012, Graves International Art
Mark King, ‘Amen Corner, Augusta National Golf Club’, 2012, Graves International Art
Mark King, ‘Amen Corner, Augusta National Golf Club’, 2012, Graves International Art
Mark King, ‘Amen Corner, Augusta National Golf Club’, 2012, Graves International Art
Mark King, ‘Amen Corner, Augusta National Golf Club’, 2012, Graves International Art
Mark King, ‘Amen Corner, Augusta National Golf Club’, 2012, Graves International Art
Mark King, ‘Amen Corner, Augusta National Golf Club’, 2012, Graves International Art
Mark King, ‘Amen Corner, Augusta National Golf Club’, 2012, Graves International Art

An original acrylic on canvas by English artist Mark King (1931-2014) titled "Amen Corner, Augusta National Golf Club", 2012. Hand signed by King lower right. Framed with moulding from Spain and linen liner from Holland. Framed size: 37" x 47". Canvas size: 30" x 40". Mint condition.

The second shot at the 11th, all of the 12th, and the first two shots at the 13th hole at Augusta are nicknamed "Amen Corner". This term was first used in print by author Herbert Warren Wind in his April 21, 1958, Sports Illustrated article about the Masters that year. In a Golf Digest article in April 1984, 26 years later, Wind told about its origin. He said he wanted a catchy phrase like baseball's "hot-corner" or football's "coffin-corner" to explain where some of the most exciting golf had taken place (the Palmer-Venturi rules issue at twelve in particular). Thus "Amen Corner" was born. He said it came from the title of a jazz record he had heard in the mid-1930s by a group led by Chicago's Mezz Mezzrow, Shouting in that Amen Corner. In a Golf Digest article in April 2008, writer Bill Fields added some new updated information about the origin of the name. He wrote that Richard Moore, a golf and jazz historian from South Carolina, tried to purchase a copy of the old Mezzrow 78 RPM disc for an "Amen Corner" exhibit he was putting together for his Golf Museum at Ahmic Lake, Ontario. After extensive research, Moore found that the record never existed. As Moore put it, Wind, himself a jazz buff, must have "unfortunately bogeyed his mind, 26 years later". While at Yale, he was no doubt familiar with, and meant all along, the popular version of the song (with the correct title, "Shoutin' in that Amen Corner" written by Andy Razaf), which was recorded by the Dorsey Brothers Orchestra, vocal by Mildred Bailey (Brunswick label No. 6655) in 1935. Moore told Fields that, being a great admirer of Wind's work over the years, he was reluctant, for months, to come forth with his discovery that contradicted Wind's memory. Moore's discovery was first reported in Golf World magazine in 2007, before Fields' longer article in Golf Digest in 2008.

In 1958 Arnold Palmer outlasted Ken Venturi to win the tournament with heroic escapes at Amen Corner. Amen Corner also played host to Masters moments such as Byron Nelson's birdie-eagle at 12 and 13 in 1937, and Sam Snead's water save at 12 in 1949 that sparked him to victory.

Series: Golf

Signature: Hand signed by King lower right

Image rights: Copyright © Graves International Art

About Mark King

English, 1931-2014, Bombay, Maharashtra, India, based in Loyola, CA, USA