Mark Rothko, ‘#10’, 1952, Seattle Art Museum
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Mark Rothko

#10, 1952

Oil on canvas
81 3/4 × 42 1/2 × 2 1/4 in
207.6 × 108 × 5.7 cm
Permanent collection
Location
Seattle, Seattle
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
About the work
Exhibition history
Provenance
Seattle Art Museum
Seattle, Seattle

Collection: Seattle Art Museum, Seattle

Medium
Painting
Image rights
© Kate Rothko Prizel & Christopher Rothko / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Photo: Paul Macapia
Mark Rothko
American, 1903–1970
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Mark Rothko’s search to express profound emotion through painting culminated in his now-signature compositions of richly colored squares filling large canvases, evoking what he referred to as “the sublime.” One of the pioneers of Color Field Painting, Rothko’s abstract arrangements of shapes, ranging from the slightly surreal biomorphic ones in his early works to the dark squares and rectangles in later years, are intended to evoke the metaphysical through viewers’ communion with the canvas in a controlled setting. “I'm not an abstractionist,” he once said. “I'm interested only in expressing basic human emotions: tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on.” His “Rothko Chapel Paintings” (1964-1967), 14 wall-sized monochromatic black paintings installed in a non-denominational church in Houston, Texas, represent the realization of Rothko’s desire that his work be viewed in close quarters.

Mark Rothko, ‘#10’, 1952, Seattle Art Museum
Save
Save
Share
Share
About the work
Exhibition history
Provenance
Seattle Art Museum
Seattle, Seattle

Collection: Seattle Art Museum, Seattle

Medium
Painting
Image rights
© Kate Rothko Prizel & Christopher Rothko / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Photo: Paul Macapia
Mark Rothko
American, 1903–1970
Follow

Mark Rothko’s search to express profound emotion through painting culminated in his now-signature compositions of richly colored squares filling large canvases, evoking what he referred to as “the sublime.” One of the pioneers of Color Field Painting, Rothko’s abstract arrangements of shapes, ranging from the slightly surreal biomorphic ones in his early works to the dark squares and rectangles in later years, are intended to evoke the metaphysical through viewers’ communion with the canvas in a controlled setting. “I'm not an abstractionist,” he once said. “I'm interested only in expressing basic human emotions: tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on.” His “Rothko Chapel Paintings” (1964-1967), 14 wall-sized monochromatic black paintings installed in a non-denominational church in Houston, Texas, represent the realization of Rothko’s desire that his work be viewed in close quarters.

Mark Rothko

#10, 1952

Oil on canvas
81 3/4 × 42 1/2 × 2 1/4 in
207.6 × 108 × 5.7 cm
Permanent collection
Location
Seattle, Seattle
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
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